Curriculum Plans

Language (Reading)

KPI

  • Responds speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes.
  • Reads accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words.
  • Reads common exception words.
  • Reads aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words.
  • Develops pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by: 1. Listening to and discussing a wide range of poems, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently.
  • Develops pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by: 2. Becoming very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales.
  • Understands both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to by: Checking that the text makes sense to them as they read.
  • Understands both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to by: As they read, correcting inaccurate reading
  • Understands both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to by: Discussing the significance of the title and events.
  • Understands both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to by: Predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far.
Language (Writing)

KPI

  • Begins to form lower-case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place.
  • Writes sentences by sequencing sentences to form short narratives.
  • Writes sentences by re-reading what has been written to check that it makes sense.
  • Spells words containing each of the 40+ phonemes already taught.
  • Names the letters of the alphabet in order.
  • Writes from memory simple sentences dictated by the teacher that include words using the GPCs and common exception words taught so far.
  • Introduces capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences.
Languages (French)

Objectives

Listening and Responding

  • Do they understand simple classroom commands?
  • Do they understand short statements?
  • Do they understand simple questions?
  • Do they understand clearly spoken speech?

Speaking

  • Can they answer with a single word?
  • Can they answer with a short phrase?

Reading and Responding

  • Can they read and understand a single word?

Writing

  • Can they copy a single word correctly?
  • Can they label items?
  • Can they choose the right words to complete a phrase?
  • Can they choose the right words to complete a short sentence?
Mathematics

KPI

  • Count within 100, forwards and backwards, starting with any number.
  • Reason about the location of numbers to 20 within the linear number system, including comparing using < > and =
  • Develop fluency in addition and subtraction facts within 10.
  • Count forwards and backwards in multiples of 2, 5 and 10, up to 10 multiples, beginning with any multiple, and count forwards and backwards through the odd numbers.
  • Compose numbers to 10 from 2 parts, and partition numbers to 10 into parts, including recognising odd and even numbers.
  • Read, write and interpret equations containing addition ( ), subtraction ( ) and equals ( ) symbols, and relate additive expressions and equations to real-life contexts.
  • Recognise common 2D and 3D shapes presented in different orientations, and know that rectangles, triangles, cuboids and pyramids are not always similar to one another.
  • Compose 2D and 3D shapes from smaller shapes to match an example, including manipulating shapes to place them in particular orientations.
Science

Objectives

Observing Closely

  • Can they talk about what they see, touch, smell, hear or taste?
  • Can they use simple equipment to help them make observations?
  • Can they find out by watching, listening, tasting, smelling and touching?

Performing Tests

  • Can they perform a simple test?
  • Can they tell other people about what they have done?
  • Can they give a simple reason for their answers?

Identifying and Classifying

  • Can they identify and classify things they observe?
  • Can they think of some questions to ask?
  • Can they answer some scientific questions?
  • Can they give a simple reason for their answers?
  • Can they explain what they have found out?
  • Can they talk about similarities and differences?
  • Can they explain what they have found out using scientific vocabulary?

Recording Findings

  • Can they show their work using pictures, labels and captions?
  • Can they record their findings using standard units?
  • Can they put some information in a chart or table?
  • Can they use ICT to show their working?
  • Can they make accurate measurements?

Plants and Animals

Plants

  • Can they name the petals, stem, leaf, bulb, flower, seed, stem and root of a plant?
  • Can they identify and name a range of common plants and trees? Can they
  • recognise deciduous and evergreen trees?
  • Can they name the trunk, branches and root of a tree?
  • Can they describe the parts of a plant (roots, stem, leaves, flowers)?
  • Can they name the main parts of a flowering plant?

Animals, including Humans

  • Can they point out some of the differences between different animals?
  • Can they sort photographs of living things and non-living things?
  • Can they identify and name a variety of common animals? (birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, invertebrates)
  • Can they describe how an animal is suited to its environment?
  • Can they identify and name a variety of common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores?
  • Can they begin to classify animals according to a number of given criteria?
  • Can they point out differences between living things and non-living things?
  • Can they name the parts of the human body that they can see? (x,1)
  • Can they draw & label basic parts of the human body? (x,1)
  • Can they identify the main parts of the human body and link them to their senses? (x,1)
  • Can they name the parts of an animal’s body? (x,1)
  • Can they name a range of domestic animals? (x,1)
  • Can they classify animals by what they eat? (carnivore, herbivore, omnivore) – (x,1)
  • Can they compare the bodies of different animals? (x,1)
  • Can they name some parts of the human body that cannot be seen? (x,1)
  • Can they say why certain animals have certain characteristics? (x,1)
  • Can they name a range of wild animals? (x,1)

Seasonal Changes

  • Can they observe changes across the four seasons? (x,2a)
  • Can they name the four seasons in order? (x,2ac)
  • Can they observe and describe weather associated with the seasons?(x,2ac)
  • Can they observe and describe how day length varies? (x,2ac)
  • Can they observe features in the environment and explain that these are related to a specific season? (x,2ac)
  • Can they observe and talk about changes in the weather? (x,2ac)
  • Can they talk about weather variation in different parts of the world?(x,2ac)

Everyday Materials

Everyday Materials (classifying and grouping)

  • Can they distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made? (x,3)
  • Can they describe materials using their senses? (x,3)
  • Can they describe materials using their senses, using specific scientific words?(x,3)
  • Can they explain what material objects are made from? (x,3)
  • Can they explain why a material might be useful for a specific job?(x,3)
  • Can they name some different everyday materials? e.g. wood, plastic, metal, water and rock(x,3)
  • Can they sort materials into groups by a given criteria?(x,3)
  • Can they explain how solid shapes can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching? (x,3)
  • Can they describe things that are similar and different between materials? (x,3)
  • Can they explain what happens to certain materials when they are heated, e.g. bread, ice, chocolate? (x,3)
  • Can they explain what happens to certain materials when they are cooled, e.g. jelly, heated chocolate? (x,3)
Social Studies (History)

Objectives

Chronological Understanding

  • Can they put up to three objects in chronological order (recent history)?
  • Can they use words and phrases like: old, new and a long time ago?
  • Can they tell me about things that happened when they were little?
  • Can they recognise that a story that is read to them may have happened a long time ago?
  • Do they know that some objects belonged to the past?
  • Can they retell a familiar story set in the past?
  • Can they explain how they have changed since they were born?
  • Can they put up to five objects/events in chronological order (recent history)?
  • Can they use words and phrases like: very old, when mummy and daddy were little?
  • Can they use the words before and after correctly?
  • Can they say why they think a story was set in the past?

Knowledge and Interpretation

  • Do they appreciate that some famous people have helped our lives be better today?
  • Do they recognise that we celebrate certain events, such as bonfire night, because of what happened many years ago?
  • Do they understand that we have a queen who rules us and that Britain has had a king or queen for many years?
  • Can they begin to identify the main differences between old and new objects?
  • Can they identify objects from the past, such as vinyl records?
  • Can they explain why certain objects were different in the past, e.g. iron, music systems, televisions?
  • Can they tell us about an important historical event that happened in the past?
  • Can they explain differences between past and present in their life and that of other children from a different time in history?
  • Do they know who will succeed the queen and how the succession works?

Historical Enquiry

  • Can they ask and answer questions about old and new objects?
  • Can they spot old and new things in a picture?
  • Can they answer questions using a artefact/ photograph provided?
  • Can they give a plausible explanation about what an object was used for in the past?
  • Can they answer questions using a range of artefacts/ photographs provided?
  • Can they find out more about a famous person from the past and carry out some research on him or her?
Social Studies (Geography)

Objectives

Geographical Inquiry

  • Can they label a diagram or photograph using some geographical words?
  • Can they find out about a locality by using different sources of evidence?
  • Can they find out about a locality by asking some relevant questions to someone else?
  • Can they say what they like and don’t like about their locality and another locality like the seaside?
  • Can they make inferences by looking at a weather chart?
  • Can they make plausible predictions about what the weather may be like in different parts of the world?

Physical Geography

  • Can they describe some physical features of their own locality?
  • Can they explain what makes a locality special?
  • Can they describe some places which are not near the school?
  • Can they describe a place outside Europe using geographical words?
  • Can they describe some of the features associated with an island?
  • Can they describe the key features of a place, using words like, beach, coast forest, hill, mountain, ocean, valley?
  • Can they find the longest and shortest route using a map?
  • Can they use a map, photographs, film or plan to describe a contrasting locality outside Europe?

Human Geography

  • Can they describe some human features of their own locality, such as the jobs people do?
  • Can they explain how the jobs people do may be different in different parts of the world?
  • Do they think that people ever spoil the area? How?
  • Do they think that people try to make the area better? How?
  • Can they explain what facilities a town or village might need?
  • Can they explain how the weather affects different people?

Geographical Knowledge

  • Can they name the continents of the world and find them in an atlas?
  • Can they name the world’s oceans and find them in an atlas?
  • Can they name the major cities of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland?
  • Can they find where they live on a map of the UK?
  • Can they locate some of the world’s major rivers and mountain ranges?
  • Can they point out the North, South, East and West associated with maps and compass?
Arts (Arts)

Objectives

Drawing

  • Can they use three different grades of pencil in their drawing (4B, 8B, HB)?
  • Can they use charcoal, pencil and pastels?
  • Can they create different tones using light and dark?
  • Can they show patterns and texture in their drawings?
  • Can they use a viewfinder to focus on a specific part of an artefact before drawing it?

Painting

  • Can they mix paint to create all the secondary colours?
  • Can they mix and match colours, predict outcomes?
  • Can they mix their own brown?
  • Can they make tints by adding white?
  • Can they make tones by adding black?

Printing

  • Can they create a print using pressing, rolling, rubbing and stamping?
  • Can they create a print like a designer?

Sketch Books

  • Can they begin to demonstrate their ideas through photographs and in their sketch books?
  • Can they set out their ideas, using ‘annotation’ in their sketch books?
  • Do they keep notes in their sketch books as to how they have changed their work?

3D/Textiles

  • Can they make a clay pot? Can they join two finger pots together?
  • Can they add line and shape to their work? Can they join fabric using glue?
  • Can they sew fabrics together?
  • Can they create part of a class patchwork?

Collage

  • Can they create individual and group collages?
  • Can they use different kinds of materials on their collage and explain why they have chosen them?
  • Can they use repeated patterns in their collage?

Use of IT

  • Can they create a picture independently?
  • Can they use simple IT mark-making tools, e.g.brush and pen tools?
  • Can they edit their own work?
  • Can they take different photographs of themselves displaying different moods?
  • Can they change their photographic images on a computer?

Knowledge

  • Can they link colours to natural and man-made objects?
  • Can they say how other artist/craft maker/designer have used colour, pattern and shape?
  • Can they create a piece of work in response to another artist’s work?
Arts (DT)

Objectives

Developing, Planning and Communicating Ideas

  • Can they think of ideas and plan what to do next?
  • Can they choose the best tools and materials? Can they give a reason why these are best?
  • Can they describe their design by using pictures, diagrams, models and words?

Working with tools, equipment, materials and components to make quality products

  • Can they join things (materials/ components) together in different ways?

Evaluating processes and products

  • Can they explain what went well with their work?
  • If they did it again, can they explain what they would improve?

Cooking and nutrition

  • Can they describe the properties of the ingredients they are using?
  • Can they explain what it means to be hygienic?
  • Are they hygienic in the kitchen?
  • Pupils should be taught to use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes
  • Pupils should be taught to understand where food comes from.

Textiles

  • Can they measure textile?
  • Can they join textiles together to make something?
  • Can they cut textiles?
  • Can they explain why they chose a certain textile?

Mechanisms

  • Can they join materials together as part of a moving product?
  • Can they add some kind of design to their product?

Use of materials

  • Can they measure materials to use in a model or structure?
  • Can they join material in different ways?
  • Can they use joining, folding or rolling to make it stronger?

Construction

  • Can they make sensible choices as to which material to use for their constructions?
  • Can they develop their own ideas from initial starting points?
  • Can they incorporate some type of movement into models?
  • Can they consider how to improve their construction?
Arts (Music)

Objectives

Performing

  • Do they sing and follow the melody (tune)?
  • Do they sing accurately at a given pitch?
  • Can they perform simple patterns and accompaniments keeping a steady pulse?
  • Can they perform with others?
  • Can they play simple rhythmic patterns on an instrument?
  • Can they sing/clap a pulse increasing or decreasing in tempo?
  • Can they sing/play rhythmic patterns in contrasting tempo; keeping to the pulse?

Composing (incl notation)

  • Can they order sounds to create a beginning, middle and end?
  • Can they create music in response to different starting points?
  • Can they choose sounds which create an effect?
  • Can they use symbols to represent sounds?
  • Can they make connections between notations and musical sounds?
  • Can they use simple structures in a piece of music?
  • Do they know that phrases are where we breathe in a song?

Appraising

  • Can they improve their own work?
  • Can they listen out for particular things when listening to music?
  • Do they recognise sounds that move by steps and by leaps?
PSHE (PE)

Objectives

Acquiring and Developing Skills

  • Can they copy and remember actions?
  • Can they repeat and explore actions with control and coordination?

Evaluating and Improving

  • Can they talk about what is different between what they did and what someone else did?
  • Can they say how they could improve?

Health and fitness

  • Can they show how to exercise safely?
  • Can they describe how their body feels during different activities?
  • Can they explain what their body needs to keep healthy?

Dance

  • Can they dance imaginatively?
  • Can they change rhythm, speed, level and direction?
  • Can they dance with control and co-ordination?
  • Can they make a sequence by linking sections together?
  • Can they link some movements to show a mood or feeling?

Games

  • Can they use hitting, kicking and/or rolling in a game?
  • Can they stay in a ‘zone’ during a game?
  • Can they decide where the best place to be is during a game?
  • Can they use one tactic in a game?
  • Can they follow rules?

Gymnastics

  • Can they plan and show a sequence of movements?
  • Can they use contrast in their sequences?
  • Are their movements controlled?
  • Can they think of more than one way to create a sequence which follows a set of ‘rules’?
  • Can they work on their own and with a partner to create a sequence?
Computing

Objectives

Algorithms and Programs

  • Can they predict the outcomes of a set of instructions?
  • Can they use right angle turns?
  • Can they use the repeat commands?
  • Can they test and amend a set of instructions?
  • Can they write a simple program and test it?
  • Can they predict what the outcome of a simple program will be?

Data Retrieving and Organising

  • Can they find information on a website?
  • Can they click links in a website?
  • Can they print a web page to use as a resource?
  • Can they experiment with text, pictures and animation to make a simple slideshow?
  • Can they use the shape tools to draw?

Communicating

  • Can they send and reply to messages sent by a safe email partner (within school)?
  • Can they word process a piece of text?
  • Can they insert/delete a word using the mouse and arrow keys?
  • Can they highlight text to change its format (B, U, I)?
  • Can they create a presentation in a small group and record the narration?
  • Can they record sounds into software and playback?
  • Can they insert pre recorded sounds into a presentation?
  • Can they capture still and moving images?

E-Safety Knowledge and Understanding

  • Can they understand the different methods of communication (e.g. email, online forums etc)?
  • Do they know you should only open email from a known source?
  • Do they know the difference between email and communication systems such as blogs and wikis?
  • Do they know that websites sometimes include pop-ups that take them away from the main site?
  • Do they know that bookmarking is a way to find safe sites again quickly?
  • Can they begin to evaluate websites and know that everything on the internet is not true?
  • Do they know that it is not always possible to copy some text and pictures from the internet?
  • Do they know that personal information should not be shared online?
  • Do they know they must tell a trusted adult immediately if anyone tries to meet them via the internet?

E-Safety Skills

  • Can they follow the school’s safer internet rules?
  • Can they use the search engines agreed by the school?
  • Can they act if they find something inappropriate online or something they are unsure of (including identifying people who can help; minimising screen; online reporting using school system etc)?
  • Can they use the internet for learning and communicating with others, making choices when navigating through sites?
  • Can they send and receive email as a class?
  • Can they recognise advertising on websites and learn to ignore it?
  • Can they use a password to access the secure network?
Language (Reading)

KPI

  • Reads accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes taught so far especially recognising alternative sounds for graphemes.
  • Reads accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same graphemes as above.
  • Reads most words (93%+) at an instructional level quickly and accurately without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered.
  • Reads aloud books closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, sounding out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation.
  • Re-reads the books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading.
  • Develops pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by listening to, discussing and expressing views about a wide range of contemporary and classic poetry, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently.
  • Develops pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by discussing the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related.
  • Develops pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by becoming increasingly familiar with a wider range of stories, fairy stories and traditional tales.
  • Develops pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by re-telling a range of stories, fairy stories and traditional tales.
  • Develops pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by Being introduced to non-fiction books that are structured in different ways.
  • Understand both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading
  • Understand both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by answering questions.
  • Understand both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far
  • Participates in discussions about books, poems and other works that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say.
Language (Writing)

KPI

  • Writes capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower case letters.
  • Develops positive attitudes towards, and stamina for, writing, by writing for different purposes.
  • Considers what is going to be written before beginning by encapsulating what they want to say, sentence by sentence.
  • Makes simple additions, revisions and corrections to writing by proof-reading to check for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation.
  • Makes simple additions, revisions and corrections to writing by segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes, spelling many correctly.
  • Makes simple additions, revisions and corrections to writing by Learning new ways of spelling phonemes for which one or more spellings are already known; and learn some words with each spelling, including a few common homophones.
  • Uses the suffixes –er, -est in adjectives and –ly to turn adjectives into adverbs.
  • Constructs subordination (using when, if, that, because) and co-ordination (using or, and, but).
  • Uses the correct choice and consistent use of present tense and past tense throughout a written piece.
  • Uses capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences.
  • Use commas to separate items in a list.
Languages (French)
Objectives NC Coverage Scope and Sequence
Listening and Responding
Do they understand a range of familiar statements?
Do they understand a range of familiar questions?
Speaking
Can they give short and simple responses to what they see and hear?
Can they name and describe people?
Can they name and describe places?
Can they name and describe objects?
Can they use (set) phrases?
Reading and Responding
Can they read and understand short phrases?
Can they read aloud single words and phrases?
Can they use books or glossaries to find the meanings of new words?
Writing
Can they copy a short familiar phrase?
Can they write or word-process set phrases we use in class?
Mathematics

KPI

  • Recognise the place value of each digit in two-digit numbers, and compose and decompose two-digit numbers using standard and nonstandard partitioning.
  • Reason about the location of any two digit number in the linear number system, including identifying the previous and next multiple of 10.
    Secure fluency in addition and subtraction facts within 10, through continued practice.
  • Add and subtract across 10.
  • Recognise the subtraction structure of ‘difference’ and answer questions of the form, “How many more…?”
  • Add and subtract within 100 by applying related one-digit addition and subtraction facts: add and subtract only ones or only tens to/from a two digit number.
  • Add and subtract within 100 by applying related one-digit addition and subtraction facts: add and subtract any 2 two-digit numbers.
  • Recognise repeated addition contexts, representing them with multiplication equations and calculating the product, within the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables.
  • Relate grouping problems where the number of groups is unknown to multiplication equations with a missing factor, and to division equations (quotitive division).
  • Use precise language to describe the properties of 2D and 3D shapes, and compare shapes by reasoning about similarities and differences in properties.
Science

Objectives

Observing Closely

  • Can they use their senses (see, touch, smell, hear or taste) to help them answer questions?
  • Can they use some scientific words to describe what they have seen and measured?
  • Can they compare several things?
  • Can they suggest ways of finding out through listening, hearing, smelling, touching and tasting?

Performing Tests

  • Can they carry out a simple fair test?
  • Can they explain why it might not be fair to compare two things?
  • Can they say whether things happened as they expected?
  • Can they suggest how to find things out?
  • Can they use prompts to find things out?
  • Can they say whether things happened as they expected and if not why not?

Identifying and Classifying

  • Can they organise things into groups?
  • Can they find simple patterns (or associations)?
  • Can they identify animals and plants by a specific criteria, eg, lay eggs or not; have feathers or not?
  • Can they suggest more than one way of grouping animals and plants and explain their reasons?

Recording Findings

  • Can they use text, diagrams, pictures, charts, tables to record their observations?
  • Can they measure using simple equipment?
  • Can they use information from books and online information to find things out?

Living Things and Their Habitats

  • Can they match certain living things to the habitats they are found in?
  • Can they explain the differences between living and non-living things?
  • Can they describe some of the life processes common to plants and animals, including humans?
  • Can they decide whether something is living, dead or non-living?
  • Can they describe how a habitat provides for the basic needs of things living there?
  • Can they describe a range of different habitats?
  • Can they describe how plants and animals are suited to their habitat?
  • Can they name some characteristics of an animal that help it to live in a particular habitat?
  • Can they describe what animals need to survive and link this to their habitats?

Animals including humans

  • Can they describe what animals need to survive?
  • Can they explain that animals grow and reproduce?
  • Can they explain why animals have offspring which grow into adults?
  • Can they describe the life cycle of some living things? (e.g. egg, chick, chicken)
  • Can they explain the basic needs of animals, including humans for survival? (water, food, air)
  • Can they describe why exercise, balanced diet and hygiene are important for humans?
  • Can they explain that animals reproduce in different ways?

Changing Materials

  • Can they explore how the shapes of solid objects can be changed? (squashing, bending, twisting, stretching)
  • Can they find out about people who developed useful new materials? (John Dunlop, Charles Macintosh, John McAdam)
  • Can they identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper, cardboard for particular uses?
  • Can they explain how things move on different surfaces?
  • Can they explain how materials are changed by heating and cooling?
  • Can they explain how materials are changed by bending, twisting and stretching?
  • Can they tell which materials cannot be changed back after being heated, cooled, bent, stretched or twisted?

Plants

  • Can they describe what plants need to survive?
  • Can they observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants?
  • Can they find out & describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy?
  • Can they describe what plants need to survive and link it to where they are found?
  • Can they explain that plants grow and reproduce in different ways?
  • Classifying and Grouping Materials
    Can they describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials?
  • Can they compare and group together a variety of materials based on their simple physical properties?
  • Can they describe the properties of different materials using words like, transparent or opaque, flexible, etc.?
  • Can they sort materials into groups and say why they have sorted them in that way?
  • Can they say which materials are natural and which are man made?
Social Studies (History)

Objectives

Chronological Understanding

  • Can they use words and phrases like: before I was born, when I was younger?
  • Can they use phrases and words like: ‘before’, ‘after’, ‘past’, ‘present’, ‘then’ and ‘now’; in their historical learning?
  • Can they use the words ‘past’ and ‘present’ accurately?
  • Can they use a range of appropriate words and phrases to describe the past?
  • Can they sequence a set of events in chronological order and give reasons for their order?
  • Can they sequence a set of objects in chronological order and give reasons for their order?
  • Can they sequence events about their own life?
  • Can they sequence events about the life of a famous person?
  • Can they try to work out how long ago an event happened?

Knowledge and Interpretation

  • Can they recount the life of someone famous from Britain who lived in the past giving attention to what they did earlier and what they did later?
  • Can they explain how their local area was different in the past?
  • Can they recount some interesting facts from an historical event, such as where the ‘Fire of London’ started?
  • Can they give examples of things that are different in their life from that of their grandparents when they were young?
  • Can they explain why Britain has a special history by naming some famous events and some famous people?
  • Can they explain what is meant by a parliament?
  • Can they give examples of things that are different in their life from that of a long time ago in a specific period of history such as the Victorian times?
  • Can they explain why someone in the past acted in the way they did?
  • Can they explain why their locality (as wide as it needs to be) is associated with a special historical event?
  • Can they explain what is meant by a democracy and why it is a good thing?

Historical Enquiry

  • Can they find out something about the past by talking to an older person?
  • Can they answer questions by using a specific source, such as an information book?
  • Can they research the life of a famous Briton from the past using different resources to help them?
  • Can they research about a famous event that happens in Britain and why it has been happening for some time?
  • Can they research the life of someone who used to live in their area using the Internet and other sources to find out about them?
  • Can they say at least two ways they can find out about the past, for example using books and the internet?
  • Can they explain why eye-witness accounts may vary?
  • Can they research about a famous event that happens somewhere else in the world and why it has been happening for some time?
Social Studies (Geography)

KEY

Social Studies Strands

1 = Human systems and economic activities
2 = Social organisation and culture
3 = Continuity and change through time
4 = Human and natural environments
5 = Resources and the environment

Scope and Sequence

a = Formulate and ask questions about the past, the future, places and society.
b = Use and analyse evidence from a variety of historical, geographical and societal sources.
c = Orientate in relation to place and time.
d = Identify roles, rights and responsibilities in society.
e = Assess the accuracy, validity and possible bias of sources.

Objectives

Geographical Inquiry

  • Can they say what they like about their locality?
  • Can they sort things they like and don’t like?
  • Can they answer some questions using different resources, such as books, the internet and atlases?
  • Can they think of a few relevant questions to ask about a locality?
  • Can they answer questions about the weather?
  • Can they keep a weather chart?
  • Can they answer questions using a weather chart?
  • Can they make plausible predictions about what the weather may be like later in the day or tomorrow?

Physical Geography

  • Can they tell someone their address?
  • Can they explain the main features of a hot and cold place?
  • Can they describe a locality using words and pictures?
  • Can they explain how the weather changes with each season?
  • Can they name key features associated with a town or village, e.g. ‘church’, ‘farm’, ‘shop’, ‘house’?
  • Can they name key features associated with a town or village, e.g. ‘factory’, ‘detached house’, ‘semi-detached house’, ‘terrace house’?

Human Geography

  • Can they begin to explain why they would wear different clothes at different times of the year?
  • Can they tell something about the people who live in hot and cold places?
  • Can they explain what they might wear if they lived in a very hot or a very cold place?
  • Can they name different jobs that people living in their area might do?

Geographical Knowledge

  • Can they identify the four countries making up the United Kingdom?
  • Can they name some of the main towns and cities in the United Kingdom?
  • Can they point out where the equator, north pole and south pole are on a globe or atlas?
  • Can they name a few towns in the south and north of the UK?
Arts (Arts)

Objectives

Drawing

  • Can they communicate something about themselves in their drawing?
  • Can they create moods in their drawings?
  • Can they draw using pencil and crayons?
  • Can they draw lines of different shapes and thickness, using 2 different grades of pencil?

Painting

  • Can they communicate something about themselves in their drawing?
  • Can they create moods in their drawings?
  • Can they draw using pencil and crayons?
  • Can they draw lines of different shapes and thickness, using 2 different grades of pencil?

Printing

  • Can they print with sponges, vegetables and fruit?
  • Can they print onto paper and textile?
  • Can they design their own printing block?
  • Can they create a repeating pattern?

Textiles

  • Can they sort threads and fabrics?
  • Can they group fabrics and threads by colour and texture?
  • Can they weave with fabric and thread?

3D

  • Can they add texture by using tools?
  • Can they make different kinds of shapes?
  • Can they cut, roll and coil materials such as clay, dough or plasticine?

Collage

  • Can they cut and tear paper and card for their collages?
  • Can they gather and sort the materials they will need?

Use of IT

  • Can they use a simple painting program to create a picture?
  • Can they use tools like fill and brushes in a painting package?
  • Can they go back and change their picture?

Knowledge

  • Can they describe what they can see and like in the work of another artist/craft maker/designer?
  • Can they ask sensible questions about a piece of art?

Creating Art

  • Engage with, and enjoy a variety of visual arts experiences.
  • Combine different formal elements to create a specific effect.
  • Use their imagination and experiences to inform their art making.
  • Create artwork in response to a range of stimuli.
  • Take responsibility for the care of tools and materials.
  • Take responsibility for their own and others’ safety in the working environment.
  • Participate in individual and collaborative experiences.
  • Identifying the materials and processes used in the creation of artwork.
  • Analyse the relationships within an artwork and construct meanings.
  • Communicate their initial responses to an artwork in visual, oral or physical modes.
  • Make personal connections to artworks.
Arts (DT)

Objectives

Developing, Planning and Communicating Ideas

  • Can they think of some ideas of their own?
  • Can they explain what they want to do?
  • Can they use pictures and words to plan?

Working with tools, equipment, materials and components to make quality products

  • Can they explain what they are making?
  • Can they explain which tools are they using?

Evaluating processes and products

  • Can they describe how something works?
  • Can they talk about their own work and things that other people have done?

Textiles

  • Can they describe how different textiles feel?
  • Can they make a product from textiles by gluing?

Mechanisms

  • Can they make a product which moves?
  • Can they cut materials using scissors?
  • Can they describe the materials using different words?
  • Can they say why they have chosen moving parts?

Use of materials

  • Can they make a structure/model using different materials?
  • Is their work tidy?
  • Can they make their model stronger if it needs to be?

Construction

  • Can they talk with others about how they want to construct their product?
  • Can they select appropriate resources and tools for their building projects?
  • Can they make simple plans before making objects, e.g. drawings, arranging pieces of construction before building?
Arts (Music)

KPI

Performing

  • Can they use their voice to speak/sing/chant?
  • Do they join in with singing? Can they use instruments to perform?
  • Can they clap short rhythmic patterns?
  • Do they look at their audience when they are performing?
  • Can they copy sounds?
  • Can they make loud and quiet sounds?
  • Do they know that the chorus keeps being repeated?

Music Appreciation

  • Distinguish the sounds of different musical instruments.
  • Listen to music and create their own work in response.
  • Express their responses to music in multiple ways (drawings, games songs, dance, oral discussion)
  • Explore body and untuned percussion instrument sounds.
    Recognise different sources of music in daily life.

Creating

  • Use the voice and body to create musical patterns.
  • Explore sound as a means of expressing imaginative ideas/
  • Recreate sounds from familiar experiences.
  • Participate in performing and creating music both individually and collectively.
  • Create their own basic musical instruments.

Composing (incl notation)

  • Can they make different sounds with their voice?
  • Can they make different sounds with instruments?
  • Can they identify changes in sounds?
  • Can they change the sound?
  • Can they repeat (short rhythmic and melodic) patterns?
  • Can they make a sequence of sounds?
  • Can they show sounds by using pictures?
  • Can they tell the difference between long and short sounds?
  • Can they tell the difference between high and low sounds?
  • Can they give a reason for choosing an instrument?

Appraising

  • Can they respond to different moods in music?
  • Can they say how a piece of music makes them feel?
  • Can they say whether they like or dislike a piece of music?
  • Can they choose sounds to represent different things?
  • Can they recognise repeated patterns?
  • Can they follow instructions about when to play or sing?
  • Can they tell the difference between a fast and slow tempo?
  • Can they tell the difference between loud and quiet sounds?
  • Can they identify two types of sound happening at the same time?
PSHE (PE)

KPI

Acquiring and Developing Skills

  • Can they copy actions?
  • Can they repeat actions and skills?
  • Can they move with control and care?

Evaluating and Improving

  • Can they talk about what they have done?
  • Can they describe what other people did?

Health and fitness

Can they describe how their body feels before, during and after an activity?

Dance

  • Can they move to music?
  • Can they copy dance moves?
  • Can they perform some dance moves?
  • Can they make up a short dance?
  • Can they move around the space safely?

Games

  • Can they throw underarm?
  • Can they roll a piece of equipment?
  • Can they hit a ball with a bat?
  • Can they move and stop safely?
  • Can they catch with both hands?
  • Can they throw in different ways?
  • Can they kick in different ways?

Dance Appreciation

  • Show curiosity about live and recorded dance performances
  • Display audience etiquette and appropriate responses such as watching,
  • listening and responding to favourite parts of the performance.
  • Respond to dance through spoken, written, visual and kinesthetic.

Gymnastics

  • Can they make their body tense, relaxed, curled and stretched?
  • Can they control their body when travelling?
  • Can they control their body when balancing?
  • Can they copy sequences and repeat them?
  • Can they roll in different ways?
  • Can they travel in different ways?
  • Can they balance in different ways?
  • Can they climb safely?
  • Can they stretch in different ways?
  • Can they curl in different ways?

Creating

  • Respond to word, rhythm and/or music through movements.
  • Communicate and express feelings through body movements.
  • Explore the dynamic flow of body movements such as fast, slow, big, small, strong, smooth, sharp, tension and relaxation
  • Use stimulus materials to extend the body and enhance body movements such as streamers, scarves, props and costumes.
  • Develop the ability to cooperate and communicate with others in creating dance.
  • Work individually or in groups with trust and confidence.
Computing

Objectives

Algorithms and Programs

  • Can they create a simple series of instructions – left and right?
  • Can they record their routes?
  • Do they understand forwards, backwards, up and down?
  • Can they put two instructions together to control a programmable toy?
  • Can they begin to plan and test a Bee-bot journey?

Data Retrieving and Organising

  • Can they capture images with a camera?
  • Can they print out a photograph from a camera with help?
  • Can they record a sound and play it back?
  • Can they enter information into a template to make a graph?
  • Can they talk about the results shown on a graph?

Communicating

  • Do they recognise what an email address looks like?
  • Have they joined in sending a class email?
  • Can they use the @ key and type an email address?
  • Can they word process ideas using a keyboard?
  • Can they use the space bar, backspace, enter, shift and arrow keys?
  • Can they print out a page from the internet?
  • Can they record pupils’ voices as a voice over?
  • Can they use a teacher prepared photo story to create a slideshow of photos

E-Safety Knowledge and Understanding

  • Can they understand the different methods of communication (e.g. email, online forums etc)?
  • Do they know you should only open email from a known source?
  • Do they know the difference between email and communication systems such as blogs and wikis?
  • Do they know that websites sometimes include pop-ups that take them away from the main site?
  • Do they know that bookmarking is a way to find safe sites again quickly?
  • Can they begin to evaluate websites and know that everything on the internet is not true?
  • Do they know that it is not always possible to copy some text and pictures from the internet?
  • Do they know that personal information should not be shared online?
  • Do they know they must tell a trusted adult immediately if anyone tries to meet them via the internet?

E-Safety Skills

  • Can they follow the school’s safer internet rules?
  • Can they use the search engines agreed by the school?
  • Can they act if they find something inappropriate online or something they are unsure of (including identifying people who can help; minimising screen; online reporting using school system etc)?
  • Can they use the internet for learning and communicating with others, making choices when navigating through sites?
  • Can they send and receive email as a class?
  • Can they recognise advertising on websites and learn to ignore it?
  • Can they use a password to access the secure network?
Language (Reading)

KPI

  • Develops positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by Listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks.
  • Develops positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by Using dictionaries to check the meaning of words they have read.
  • Develops positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by Identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books.
  • Reads further exception words, noting the unusual correspondence between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word.
  • Understands what they have read independently by Drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions and justifying inferences with evidence.
  • Understands what they have read independently by Predicting what might happen from details stated and implied.
  • Retrieves and records information from non-fiction.
Language (Writing)

KPI

  • Organising paragraphs around a theme.
  • In narratives, creates settings, characters and plot.
  • Proof-reads for spelling and punctuation errors
  • Uses the forms ‘a’ or ‘an’ according to whether the next word begins with a consonant or a vowel; eg, a rock, an open box.
  • Expresses time, place and cause using conjunctions.
    Introduces inverted commas to punctuate direct speech.
  • Uses headings and sub-headings to aid presentation.
  • Uses the present perfect form of verbs instead of the simple past; eg, ‘He has gone out to play’ in contrast to ‘He went out to play.’
Languages (French)

KPI

Listening and Responding

  • Do they understand short passages made up of familiar language?
  • Do they understand instructions, messages and dialogues within short passages?
  • Can they identify and note the main points and give a personal response on a passage?

Speaking

  • Can they have a short conversation where they are saying 2-3 things?
  • Can they use short phrases to give a personal response?

Reading and Responding

  • Can they read and understand short texts using familiar language?
  • Can they identify and note the main points and give a personal response?
  • Can they read independently?
  • Can they use a bilingual dictionary or glossary to look up new words?

Writing

  • Can they write 2-3 short sentences on a familiar topic?
  • Can they say what they like and dislike about a familiar topic?
Mathematics

KPI

  • Know that 10 tens are equivalent to 1 hundred, and that 100 is 10 times the size of 10; apply this to identify and work out how many 10s there are in other three digit multiples of 10.
  • Recognise the place value of each digit in three-digit numbers, and compose and decompose three-digit numbers using standard and non-standard partitioning.
  • Reason about the location of any three digit number in the linear number system, including identifying the previous and next multiple of 100 and 10.
  • Divide 100 into 2, 4, 5 and 10 equal parts, and read scales/number lines marked in multiples of 100 with 2, 4, 5 and 10 equal parts.
  • Secure fluency in addition and subtraction facts that bridge 10, through continued practice.
  • Recall multiplication facts, and corresponding division facts, in the 10, 5, 2, 4 and 8 multiplication tables, and recognise products in these multiplication tables as multiples of the corresponding number.
  • Apply place-value knowledge to known additive and multiplicative number facts (scaling facts by 10).
  • Calculate complements to 100
  • Add and subtract up to three-digit numbers using columnar methods.
  • Manipulate the additive relationship: Understand the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction, and how both relate to the part–part–whole structure. Understand and use the commutative property of addition, and understand the related property for subtraction.
  • Apply known multiplication and division facts to solve contextual problems with different structures, including quotative and partitive division.
  • Interpret and write proper fractions to represent 1 or several parts of a whole that is divided into equal parts.
  • Find unit fractions of quantities using known division facts (multiplication tables fluency).
  • Reason about the location of any fraction within 1 in the linear number system.
  • Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator, within 1.
  • Recognise right angles as a property of shape or a description of a turn, and identify right angles in 2D shapes presented in different orientations.
  • Draw polygons by joining marked points, and identify parallel and perpendicular sides.
Science

KPI

Working Scientifically

Planning

  • Can they use different ideas and suggest how to find something out?
  • Can they make and record a prediction before testing?
  • Can they plan a fair test and explain why it was fair?
  • Can they set up a simple fair test to make comparisons?
  • Can they explain why they need to collect information to answer a question?
  • Can they record and present what they have found using scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, bar charts and tables?

Obtaining and Presenting Evidence

  • Can they measure using different equipment and units of measure?
  • Can they record their observations in different ways? (labelled diagrams, charts etc)
  • Can they describe what they have found using scientific language?
  • Can they make accurate measurements using standard units?
  • Can they explain their findings in different ways (display, presentation, writing)?
  • Can they use their findings to draw a simple conclusion?
  • Can they suggest improvements and predictions for further tests?

Considering Evidence and Evaluating

  • Can they explain what they have found out and use their measurements to say whether it helps to answer their question?
  • Can they use a range of equipment (including a datalogger) in a simple test?
  • Can they suggest how to improve their work if they did it again?

Knowledge

Animals Including Humans

  • Can they explain the importance of a nutritionally balanced diet?
  • Can they describe how nutrients, water and oxygen are transported within animals and humans?
  • Can they identify that animals, including humans, cannot make their own food: they get nutrition from what they eat?
  • Can they describe and explain the skeletal system of a human?
  • Can they describe and explain the muscular system of a human?
  • Can they explain how the muscular and skeletal systems work together to create movement?
  • Can they classify living things and non-living things by a number of characteristics that they have thought of?
  • Can they explain how people, weather and the environment can affect living things?
  • Can they explain how certain living things depend on one another to survive?

Forces and Magnets

  • Can they compare how things move on different surfaces? Can they observe that magnetic forces can be transmitted without direct contact?
  • Can they observe how some magnets attract or repel each other?
  • Can they classify which materials are attracted to magnets and which are not?
  • Can they notice that some forces need contact between two objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance?
  • Can they compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet?
  • Can they identify some magnetic materials?
  • Can they describe magnets have having two poles (N & S)? Can they predict whether two magnets will attract or repel each other depending on which poles are facing?
  • Can they investigate the strengths of different magnets and find fair ways to compare them?

Plants

  • Can they identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants? (roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers)?
  • Can they explore the requirement of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow)?
  • Can they explain how they vary from plant to plant?
  • Can they investigate the way in which water is transported within plants?
  • Can they explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal?
  • Can they classify a range of common plants according to many criteria (environment found, size, climate required, etc.)?

Rocks

  • Can they compare and group together different rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties?
  • Can they describe and explain how different rocks can be useful to us?
  • Can they describe and explain the differences between sedimentary and igneous rocks, considering the way they are formed?
  • Can they describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rock?
  • Can they recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter?
  • Can they classify igneous and sedimentary rocks?
  • Can they begin to relate the properties of rocks with their uses?

Light

  • Can they recognise that they need light in order to see things?
  • Can they recognise that dark is the absence of light?
  • Can they notice that light is reflected from surfaces?
  • Can they recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes?
  • Can they recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by a solid object?
  • Can they find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change?
  • Can they explain why lights need to be bright or dimmer according to need?
  • Can they explain the difference between transparent, translucent and opaque?
  • Can they explain why lights need to be bright or dimmer according to need?
  • Can they make a bulb go on and off?
  • Can they say what happens to the electricity when more batteries are added?
  • Can they explain why their shadow changes when the light source is moved closer or further from the object?
Social Studies (History)

KPI

Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

  • This could include: late Neolithic hunter-gatherers and early farmers e.g. Skara Brae
  • Bronze Age religion, technology and travel, e.g. Stonehenge
  • Iron Age hill forts: tribal kingdoms, farming, art and culture

The achievements of the earliest civilizations

an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one or more of the following: Ancient Sumer; The Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang Dynasty of Ancient China.

Chronological understanding

  • Can they describe events and periods using the words: BC, AD and decade?
  • Can they describe events from the past using dates when things happened?
  • Can they describe events and periods using the words: ancient and century?
  • Can they use a timeline within a specific time in history to set out the order things may have happened?
  • Can they use their mathematical knowledge to work out how long ago events would have happened?
  • Can they set out on a timeline, within a given period, what special events took place?
  • Can they begin to recognise and quantify the different time periods that exists between different groups that invaded Britain?

Knowledge and Interpretation

  • Do they appreciate that the early Brits would not have communicated as we do or have eaten as we do?
  • Can they begin to picture what life would have been like for the early settlers?
  • Can they recognise that Britain has been invaded by several different groups over time?
  • Do they realise that invaders in the past would have fought fiercely, using hand to hand combat?
  • Can they suggest why certain events happened as they did in history?
  • Can they suggest why certain people acted as they did in history?
  • Can they begin to appreciate why Britain would have been an important country to have invaded and conquered?
  • Can they appreciate that war/s would inevitably have brought much distress and bloodshed?
  • Do they have an appreciation that wars start for specific reasons and can last for a very long time?
  • Do they appreciate that invaders were often away from their homes for very long periods and would have been ‘homesick’?

Historical Enquiry

  • Do they recognise the part that archaeologists have had in helping us understand more about what happened in the past?
  • Can they use various sources of evidence to answer questions?
  • Can they use various sources to piece together information about a period in history?
  • Can they research a specific event from the past?
  • Can they use their ‘information finding’ skills in writing to help them write about historical information?
  • Can they, through research, identify similarities and differences between given periods in history?
  • Can they begin to use more than one source of information to bring together a conclusion about an historical event?
  • Can they use specific search engines on the Internet to help them find information more rapidly?
Social Studies (Geography)

Objectives

Geographical Inquiry

  • Do they use correct geographical words to describe a place and the events that happen there?
  • Can they identify key features of a locality by using a map?
  • Can they begin to use 4 figure grid references?
  • Can they accurately plot NSEW on a map?
  • Can they use some basic OS map symbols?
  • Can they make accurate measurement of distances within 100 Km?
  • Can they work out how long it would take to get to a given destination taking account of the mode of transport?

Physical Geography

  • Can they use maps and atlases appropriately by using contents and indexes?
  • Can they describe how volcanoes are created?
  • Can they describe how earthquakes are created?
  • Can they confidently describe physical features in a locality?
  • Can they locate the Mediterranean and explain why it is a popular holiday destination?
  • Can they recognise the 8 points of the compass (N,NW, W, S, SW, SE, E, NE)?
  • Can they explain why a locality has certain physical features?

Human Geography

  • Can they describe how volcanoes have an impact on people’s lives?
  • Can they confidently describe human features in a locality?
  • Can they explain why a locality has certain human features?
  • Can they explain why a place is like it is?
  • Can they explain how the lives of people living in the Mediterranean would be different from their own?
  • Can they explain how people’s lives vary due to weather?

Geographical Knowledge

  • Can they name a number of countries in the Northern Hemisphere?
  • Can they locate and name some of the world’s most famous volcanoes?
  • Can they name and locate some well-known European countries?
  • Can they name and locate the capital cities of neighbouring European countries?
  • Are they aware of different weather in different parts of the world, especially Europe?
  • Can they name the two largest seas around Europe?
Arts (Arts)

KPI

Drawing

  • Can they show facial expressions in their drawings?
  • Can they use their sketches to produce a final piece of work?
  • Can they write an explanation of their sketch in notes?
  • Can they use different grades of pencil shade, to show different tones and texture?

Painting

  • Can they predict with accuracy the colours that they mix?
  • Do they know where each of the primary and secondary colours sits on the colour wheel?
  • Can they create a background using a wash?
  • Can they use a range of brushes to create different effects?

Printing

  • Can they make a printing block?
  • Can they make a 2 colour print?

Sketchbooks

  • Can they use their sketch books to express feelings about a subject and to describe likes and dislikes?
  • Can they make notes in their sketchbooks about techniques used by artists?
  • Can they suggest improvements to their work by keeping notes in their sketchbooks?

3D/Textiles

  • Can they add onto their work to create texture and shape?
  • Can they work with life size materials?
  • Can they create pop-ups? Can they use more than one type of stitch?
  • Can they join fabric together to form a quilt using padding?
  • Can they use sewing to add detail to a piece of work?
  • Can they add texture to a piece of work?

Collage

  • Can they cut very accurately?
  • Can they overlap materials?
  • Can they experiment using different colours?
  • Can they use mosaic?
  • Can they use montage?

Use of IT

  • Can they use the printed images they take with a digital camera and combine them with other media to produce art work?
  • Can they use IT programs to create a piece of work that includes their own work and that of others (using web)?
  • Can they use the web to research an artist or style of art?

Knowledge

  • Can they compare the work of different artists?
  • Can they explore work from other cultures?
  • Can they explore work from other periods of time?
  • Are they beginning to understand the viewpoints of others by looking at images of people and understand how they are feeling and what the artist is trying to express in their work?

Creating Art

  • Engage with, and enjoy a variety of visual arts experiences.
  • Combine different formal elements to create a specific effect.
  • Use their imagination and experiences to inform their art making.
  • Create artwork in response to a range of stimuli.
  • Take responsibility for the care of tools and materials.
  • Take responsibility for their own and others’ safety in the working environment.
  • Participate in individual and collaborative experiences.
  • Identifying the materials and processes used in the creation of artwork.
  • Analyse the relationships within an artwork and construct meanings.
  • Communicate their initial responses to an artwork in visual, oral or physical modes.
  • Make personal connections to artworks.
Arts (DT)

KPI

Developing, Planning and Communicating Ideas

  • Can they show that their design meets a range of requirements?
  • Can they put together a step-by-step plan which shows the order and also what equipment and tools they need?
  • Can they describe their design using an accurately labelled sketch and words?
  • How realistic is their plan?

Working with tools, equipment, materials and components to make quality products

  • Can they use equipment and tools accurately?

Evaluating processes and products

  • Can they explain what they changed which made their design even better?

Cooking and Nutrition

  • Can they choose the right ingredients for a product?
  • Can they use equipment safely?
  • Can they make sure that their product looks attractive?
  • Can they describe how their combined ingredients come together?
  • Can they set out to grow plants such as cress and herbs from seed with the intention of using them for their food product?

Textiles

  • Can they join textiles of different types in different ways?
  • Can they choose textiles both for their appearance and also qualities?

Moldable materials

  • Do they select the most appropriate materials?
  • Can they use a range of techniques to shape and mould?
  • Do they use finishing techniques?

Electrical and mechanical components

  • Do they select the most appropriate tools and techniques to use for a given task?
  • Can they make a product which uses both electrical and mechanical components?
  • Can they use a simple circuit?
  • Can they use a number of components?

Stiff and flexible sheet materials

  • Do they use the most appropriate materials?
  • Can they work accurately to make cuts and holes?
  • Can they join materials?
Arts (Music)

KPI

Performing

  • Do they sing in tune with expression?
  • Do they control their voice when singing?
  • Can they play clear notes on instruments?
  • Can they work with a partner to create a piece of music using more than one instrument?

Composing (including notation)

  • Can they use different elements in their composition?
  • Can they create repeated patterns with different instruments?
  • Can they compose melodies and songs?
  • Can they create accompaniments for tunes?
  • Can they combine different sounds to create a specific mood or feeling?
  • Do they understand metre in 2 and 3 beats; then 4 and 5 beats?
  • Do they understand how the use of tempo can provide contrast within a piece of music?

Appraising

  • Can they improve their work; explaining how it has improved?
  • Can they use musical words (the elements of music) to describe a piece of music and compositions?
  • Can they use musical words to describe what they like and dislike?
  • Can they recognise the work of at least one famous composer?
  • Can they tell whether a change is gradual or sudden?
  • Can they identify repetition, contrasts and variations?
PSHE (PE)

KPI

Acquiring and Developing Skills

  • Can they select and use the most appropriate skills, actions or ideas?
  • Can they move and use actions with co-ordination and control?

Evaluating and Improving

  • Can they explain how their work is similar and different from that of others?
  • With help, do they recognise how performances could be improved?

Health and fitness

  • Can they explain why it is important to warm-up and cool-down?
  • Can they identify some muscle groups used in gymnastic activities?

Dance

  • Can they improvise freely, translating ideas from a stimulus into movement?
  • Can they share and create phrases with a partner and in small groups?
  • Can they repeat, remember and perform these phrases in a dance?

Games

  • Can they throw and catch with control when under limited pressure?
  • Are they aware of space and use it to support team-mates and cause problems for the opposition?
  • Do they know and use rules fairly to keep games going?
  • Can they keep possession with some success when using equipment that is not used for throwing and catching skills?

Outdoor/Adventurous

  • Can they follow a map in a familiar context?
  • Can they move from one location to another following a map?
  • Can they use clues to follow a route?
  • Can they follow a route safely?

Gymnastics

  • Can they use a greater number of their own ideas for movement in response to a task?
  • Can they adapt sequences to suit different types of apparatus and their partner’s ability?
  • Can they explain how strength and suppleness affect performances?
  • Can they compare and contrast gymnastic sequences, commenting on similarities and differences?

Athletics

  • Can they run at fast, medium and slow speeds, changing speed and direction?
  • Can they link running and jumping activities with some fluency, control and consistency?
  • Can they make up and repeat a short sequence of linked jumps?
  • Can they take part in a relay activity, remembering when to run and what to do?
  • Do they throw a variety of objects, changing their action for accuracy and distance?
Computing

Algorithms and Programs

  • Can they experiment with variables to control models?
  • Can they use 90 degree and 45 degree turns?
  • Can they give an on-screen robot directional instructions?
  • Can they draw a square, rectangle and other regular shapes on screen, using commands?
  • Can they use repeat command in logo to create a pattern?
  • Can they write more complex programs?

Data Retrieving and Organising

  • Can they review images on a camera and delete unwanted images?
  • Have they experienced downloading images from a camera into files on the computer?
  • Can they use photo editing software to crop photos and add effects?
  • Can they manipulate sound when using simple recording storyboarding?

Presentation

  • Can they create a presentation that moves from slide to slide and is aimed at a specific audience?
  • Can they combine text, images and sounds and show awareness of audience?
  • Do they know how to manipulate text, underline text, centre text, change font and size and save text to a folder?

Communicating

  • Can they use the email address book?
  • Can they open and send an attachment?
  • Can they contribute to a class blog?

Databases

  • Can they input data into a prepared database?
  • Can they sort and search a database to answer simple questions?
  • Can they use a branching database?

Using the internet

  • Can they find relevant information by browsing a menu.
  • Can they search for an image, then copy and paste it into a document?
  • Can they use ‘Save picture as‘ to save an image to the computer?
  • Can they copy and paste text into a document?
  • Do they begin to use note making skills to decide what text to copy?
  • Can they search by keyword using a child friendly search engine?
  • Can they bookmark a page into your favourites?

E-Safety Skills

  • Do they follow the school’s safer internet rules?
  • Do they recognise the difference between the work of others which has been copied (plagiarism) and restructuring and re-presenting materials in ways which are unique and new?
  • Can they begin to identify when emails should not be opened and when an attachment may not be safe?
  • Can they explain how to use email safely?
  • Can they use different search engines?

E-Safety Knowledge and Understanding

  • Do they understand the need for rules to keep them safe when exchanging learning and ideas online?
  • Can they recognise that information on the internet may not be accurate or reliable and may be used for bias, manipulation or persuasion?
  • Do they understand that the internet contains fact, fiction and opinion and begin to distinguish between them?
  • Can they use strategies to verify information, e.g. crosschecking?
  • Do they understand the need for caution when using an internet search for images and what to do if they find an unsuitable image?
  • Do they understand that copyright exists on most digital images, video and recorded music?
  • Do they understand the need to keep personal information and passwords private?
  • Do they understand that if they make personal information available online it may be seen and used by others?
  • Do they know how to respond if asked for personal information or feel unsafe about content of a message?
  • Can they recognise that cyber bullying is unacceptable and will be sanctioned in line with the school’s policy?
  • Do they know how to report an incident of cyber bullying?
  • Do they know the difference between online communication tools used in school and those used at home?
  • Do they understand the need to develop an alias for some public online use?
  • Do they understand that the outcome of internet searches at home may be different than at school?
Language (Reading)

KPI

  • Applies a growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and morphology) – as listed in English appendix 1 of the national curriculum document – both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that are met.
  • Listens to and discusses a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks.
  • Uses dictionaries to check the meaning of words that have been read.
    Identifies themes and conventions in a wide range of books.
  • Reads further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word.
  • Checks that the text makes sense to the individual, discussing his understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context.
  • Draws inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions and justifies inferences with evidence.
  • Predicts what might happen from details stated and implied.
  • Identifies main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarises these.
  • Retrieves and records information from nonfiction.
Language (Writing)

KPI

  • Organises paragraphs around a theme.
  • In narratives, creates settings, characters and plot.
  • Proof-reads for spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Writes from memory simple sentence, dictated by the teacher, that include words and punctuation taught so far.
  • Uses standard English forms for verb inflections instead of local spoken forms.
  • Uses fronted adverbials.
  • Can choose an appropriate pronoun or noun within and across sentences to aid cohesion and avoid repetition.
  • Uses inverted commas and other punctuation to indicate direct speech.
Languages (French)

KPI

Listening and Responding

  • Do they understand short passages made up of familiar language?
  • Do they understand instructions, messages and dialogues within short passages?
  • Can they identify and note the main points and give a personal response on a passage?

Speaking

  • Can they have a short conversation where they are saying 2-3 things?
  • Can they use short phrases to give a personal response?

Reading and Responding

  • Can they read and understand short texts using familiar language?
  • Can they identify and note the main points and give a personal response?
  • Can they read independently?
  • Can they use a bilingual dictionary or glossary to look up new words?

Writing

  • Can they write 2-3 short sentences on a familiar topic?
  • Can they say what they like and dislike about a familiar topic?
Mathematics

KPI

  • Know that 10 hundreds are equivalent to 1 thousand, and that 1,000 is 10 times the size of 100; apply this to identify and work out how many 100s there are in other four-digit multiples of 100.
  • Recognise the place value of each digit in four-digit numbers, and compose and decompose four-digit numbers using standard and nonstandard partitioning.
  • Reason about the location of any four digit number in the linear number system, including identifying the previous and next multiple of 1,000 and 100, and rounding to the nearest of each.
  • Divide 1,000 into 2, 4, 5 and 10 equal parts, and read scales/number lines marked in multiples of 1,000 with 2, 4, 5 and 10 equal parts.
  • Recall multiplication and division facts up to 12×12 and recognise products in multiplication tables as multiples of the corresponding number
  • Solve division problems, with two-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, that involve remainders, and interpret remainders appropriately according to the context.
  • Apply place-value knowledge to known additive and multiplicative number facts (scaling facts by 100)
  • Multiply and divide whole numbers by 10 and 100 (keeping to whole number quotients); understand this as equivalent to making a number 10 or 100 times the size.
  • Manipulate multiplication and division equations, and understand and apply the commutative property of multiplication.
  • Understand and apply the distributive property of multiplication.
  • Reason about the location of mixed numbers in the linear number system.
  • Convert mixed numbers to improper fractions and vice versa.
  • Add and subtract improper and mixed fractions with the same denominator, including bridging whole numbers.
  • Draw polygons, specified by coordinates in the first quadrant, and translate within the first quadrant.
  • Identify regular polygons, including equilateral triangles and squares, as those in which the side-lengths are equal and the angles are equal. Find the perimeter of regular and irregular polygons.
  • Identify line symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations.
  • Reflect shapes in a line of symmetry and complete a symmetric figure or pattern with respect to a specified line of symmetry
Science

KPI

Planning

  • Can they set up a simple fair test to make comparisons?
  • Can they plan a fair test and isolate variables, explaining why it was fair and which variables have been isolated?
  • Can they suggest improvements and predictions?
  • Can they decide which information needs to be collected and decide which is the best way for collecting it?
  • Can they use their findings to draw a simple conclusion?
  • Can they plan and carry out an investigation by controlling variables fairly and accurately?
  • Can they use test results to make further predictions and set up further comparative tests?

Obtaining and Presenting Evidence

  • Can they take measurements using different equipment and units of measure and record what they have found in a range of ways?
  • Can they make accurate measurements using standard units?
  • Can they explain their findings in different ways (display, presentation, writing)?
  • Can they record more complex data and results using scientific diagrams, classification keys, tables, bar charts, line graphs and models?

Considering Evidence and Evaluating

  • Can they find any patterns in their evidence or measurements?
  • Can they make a prediction based on something they have found out?
  • Can they evaluate what they have found using scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, bar charts and tables?
  • Can they use straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings?
  • Can they identify differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas or processes?
  • Can they report findings from investigations through written explanations and conclusions?
  • Can they use a graph or diagram to answer scientific questions?

Animals Including Humans

  • Can they identify and name the basic parts of the digestive system in humans?
  • Can they describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans?
  • Can they identify the simple function of different types of teeth in humans?
  • Can they compare the teeth of herbivores and carnivores?
  • Can they explain what a simple food chain shows?
  • Can they construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey?
  • Can they classify living things and non-living things by a number of characteristics that they have thought of?
  • Can they explain how people, weather and the environment can affect living things?
  • Can they explain how certain living things depend on one another to survive?

Living Things and Their Habitats

  • Can they recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways?
  • Can they explore and use a classification key to group, identify and name a variety of living things? (plants, vertebrates, invertebrates)
  • Can they compare the classification of common plants and animals to living things found in other places? (under the sea, prehistoric)
  • Do they recognise that environments can change and this can sometimes pose a danger to living things?
  • Can they give reasons for how they have classified animals and plants, using their characteristics and how they are suited to their environment?
  • Can they explore the work of pioneers in classification? (e.g. Carl Linnaeus)
  • Can they name and group a variety of living things based on feeding patterns? (producer, consumer, predator, prey, herbivore, carnivore, omnivore)

States of Matter

  • Can they compare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases?
  • Can they explain what happens to materials when they are heated or cooled?
  • Can they measure or research the temperature at which different materials change state in degrees Celsius?
  • Can they use measurements to explain changes to the state of water?
  • Can they identify the part that evaporation and condensation has in the water cycle?
  • Can they associate the rate of evaporation with temperature?
  • Can they group and classify a variety of materials according to the impact of temperature on them?
  • Can they explain what happens over time to materials such as puddles on the playground or washing hanging on a line?
  • Can they relate temperature to change of state of materials?

Sound

  • Can they describe a range of sounds and explain how they are made?
  • Can they associate some sounds with something vibrating?
  • Can they compare sources of sound and explain how the sounds differ?
  • Can they explain how to change a sound (louder/softer)?
  • Can they recognise how vibrations from sound travel through a medium to a ear?
  • Can they find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produce it?
  • Can they find patterns between the volume of the sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it?
  • Can they recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases?
  • Can they explain how you could change the pitch of a sound?
  • Can they investigate how different materials can affect the pitch and volume of sounds?
  • Can they explain why sound gets fainter or louder according to the distance?
  • Can they explain how pitch and volume can be changed in a variety of ways?
  • Can they work out which materials give the best insulation for sound?

Electricity

  • Can they identify common appliances that run on electricity?
  • Can they construct a simple series electric circuit?
  • Can they identify and name the basic part in a series circuit, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers?
  • Can they identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery?
  • Can they recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit?
  • Can they associate a switch opening with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuit?
  • Can they recognise some common conductors and insulators?
  • Can they associate metals with being good conductors?
  • Can they explain how a bulb might get lighter?
  • Can they recognise if all metals are conductors of electricity?
  • Can they work out which metals can be used to connect across a gap in a circuit?
  • Can they explain why cautions are necessary for working safely with electricity?
Social Studies (History)

The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain

  • Julius Caesar’s attempted invasion in 55-54 BC
  • the Roman Empire by AD 42 and the power of its army
  • successful invasion by Claudius and conquest, including Hadrian’s Wall
  • British resistance, e.g. Boudica
  • “Romanisation” of Britain: sites such as Caerwent and the impact of technology, culture and beliefs, including early Christianity

Ancient Greece
a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world.

Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots

  • Roman withdrawal from Britain in c. AD 410 and the fall of the western Roman Empire
  • Scots invasions from Ireland to north Britain (now Scotland)
  • Anglo-Saxon invasions, settlements and kingdoms: place names and village life
  • Anglo-Saxon art and culture
  • Christian conversion – Canterbury, Iona and Lindisfarne

Chronological Understanding

  • Can they plot recent history on a timeline using centuries?
  • Can they place periods of history on a timeline showing periods of time?
  • Can they use their mathematical skills to round up time differences into centuries and decades?
  • Can they use their mathematical skills to help them work out the time differences between certain major events in history?
  • Can they begin to build up a picture of what main events happened in Britain/ the world during different centuries?

Knowledge and Interpretation

  • Can they explain how events from the past have helped shape our lives?
  • Do they appreciate that wars have happened from a very long time ago and are often associated with invasion, conquering or religious differences?
  • Do they know that people who lived in the past cooked and travelled differently and used different weapons from ours?
  • Do they recognise that the lives of wealthy people were very different from those of poor people?
  • Do they appreciate how items found belonging to the past are helping us to build up an accurate picture of how people lived in the past?
  • Can they recognise that people’s way of life in the past was dictated by the work they did?
  • Do they appreciate that the food people ate was different because of the availability of different sources of food?
  • Do they appreciate that weapons will have changed by the developments and inventions that would have occurred within a given time period?
  • Do they appreciate that wealthy people would have had a very different way of living which would have impacted upon their health and education?

Historical enquiry

  • Can they research two versions of an event and say how they differ?
  • Can they research what it was like for a child in a given period from the past and use photographs and illustrations to present their findings?
  • Can they give more than one reason to support an historical argument?
  • Can they communicate knowledge and understanding orally and in writing and offer points of view based upon what they have found out?
  • Can they independently, or as part of a group, present an aspect they have researched about a given period of history using multi-media skills when doing so?
Social Studies (Geography)

Objectives

Geographical Inquiry

  • Can they carry out a survey to discover features of cities and villages?
  • Can they find the same place on a globe and in an atlas?
  • Can they label the same features on an aerial photograph as on a map?
  • Can they plan a journey to a place in England?
  • Can they accurately measure and collect information(e.g. rainfall, temperature, wind speed, noise levels etc.)?
  • Can they give accurate measurements between 2 given places within the UK?

Physical Geography

  • Can they describe the main features of a well known city?
  • Can they describe the main features of a village?
  • Can they describe the main physical differences between cities and villages?
  • Can they use appropriate symbols to represent different physical features on a map?
  • Can they explain how a locality has changed over time with reference to physical features?

Human Geography

  • Can they explain why people are attracted to live in cities?
  • Can they explain why people may choose to live in a village rather than a city?
  • Can they explain how a locality has changed over time with reference to human features?
  • Can they find different views about an environmental issue? What is their view?
  • Can they suggest different ways that a locality could be changed and improved?
  • Can they explain how people are trying to manage their environment?

Geographical Knowledge

  • Can they locate the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn?
  • Do they know the difference between the British Isles, Great Britain and UK?
  • Do they know the countries that make up the European Union?
  • Can they name up to six cities in the UK and locate them on a map?
  • Can they locate and name some of the main islands that surround the UK?
  • Can they name the areas of origin of the main ethnic groups in the UK & in their school?
  • Can they name the counties that make up the home counties of London?
  • Can they name some of the main towns and cities in Yorkshire and Lancashire?
Arts (Arts)

KPI

Drawing

  • Can they identify and draw simple objects, and use marks and lines to produce texture?
  • Can they identify and draw simple objects, and use marks and lines to produce texture?
  • Can they organise line, tone, shape and colour to represent figures and forms in movement?
  • Can they show reflections? Can they explain why they have chosen specific materials to draw with?

Painting

  • Can they create all the colours they need?
  • Can they create mood in their paintings?
  • Do they successfully use shading to create mood and feeling?

Printing

  • Can they print using at least four colours?
  • Can they create an accurate print design?
  • Can they print onto different materials?

Sketchbooks

  • Can they use their sketch books to express their feelings about various subjects and outline likes and dislikes?
  • Can they produce a montage all about themselves?
  • Do they use their sketch books to adapt and improve their original ideas?
  • Do they keep notes about the purpose of their work in their sketch books?

3D/Textiles

  • Do they experiment with and combine materials and processes to design and make 3D form?
  • Can they begin to sculpt clay and other moldable materials?
  • Can they use early textile and sewing skills as part of a project?

Collage

  • Can they use ceramic mosaic?
  • Can they combine visual and tactile qualities?

Use of IT

  • Can they present a collection of their work on a slide show?
  • Can they create a piece of art work which includes the integration of digital images they have taken?
  • Can they combine graphics and text based on their research?

Knowledge

  • Can they experiment with different styles which artists have used?
  • Can they explain art from other periods of history?
Arts (DT)

KPI

Developing, Planning and Communicating Ideas

  • Have they thought of how they will check if their design is successful?
  • Can they begin to explain how they can improve their original design?
  • Can they evaluate their product, thinking of both appearance and the way it works?
  • Do they take time to consider how they could have made their idea better?

Working with tools, equipment, materials and components to make quality products

  • Can they tell if their finished product is going to be good quality?
  • Are they conscious of the need to produce something that will be liked by others?
  • Can they show a good level of expertise when using a range of tools and equipment?
  • Do they work at their product even though their original idea might not have worked?

Cooking and Nutrition

  • Do they know what to do to be hygienic and safe?
  • Have they thought what they can do to present their product in an interesting way?

Textiles

  • Do they think what the user would want when choosing textiles?
  • Have they thought about how to make their product strong?
  • Can they devise a template?
  • Can they explain how to join things in a different way?

Moldable materials

  • Can they use a range of advanced techniques to shape and mould?
  • Do they use finishing techniques, showing an awareness of audience?

Electrical and mechanical components

  • Can they add things to their circuits?
  • How have they altered their product after checking it?
  • Are they confident about trying out new and different ideas?

Evaluating processes and products

  • Have they thought of how they will check if their design is successful?
  • Can they begin to explain how they can improve their original design?
  • Can they evaluate their product, thinking of both appearance and the way it works?
  • Do they take time to consider how they could have made their idea better?

Stiff and flexible sheet materials

  • Can they measure carefully so as to make sure they have not made mistakes?
  • How have they attempted to make their product strong?
Arts (Music)

KPI

Performing

  • Can they perform a simple part rhythmically?
  • Can they sing songs from memory with accurate pitch?
  • Can they improvise using repeated patterns?
  • Can they use selected pitches simultaneously to produce simple harmony?

Composing (including notation)

  • Can they use notations to record and interpret sequences of pitches?
  • Can they use standard notation?
  • Can they use notations to record compositions in a small group or on their own?
  • Can they use their notation in a performance?
  • Can they explore and use sets of pitches, e.g. 4 or 5 note scales?
  • Can they show how they can use dynamics to provide contrast?

Appraising

  • Can they explain the place of silence and say what effect it has?
  • Can they start to identify the character of a piece of music?
  • Can they describe and identify the different purposes of music?
  • Can they begin to identify with the style of work of Beethoven, Mozart and Elgar?
  • Can they identify how a change in timbre can change the effect of a piece of music?
PSHE (PE)

KPI

Acquiring and Developing Skills

  • Can they select and use the most appropriate skills, actions or ideas?
  • Can they move and use actions with co-ordination and control? AG
  • Can they make up their own small-sided game?

Evaluating and Improving

  • Can they explain how their work is similar and different from that of others?
  • Can they use their comparison to improve their work?

Health and fitness

  • Can they explain why warming up is important?
  • Can they explain why keeping fit is good for their health?

Dance

  • Can they take the lead when working with a partner or group?
  • Can they use dance to communicate an idea?
  • Can they work on their movements and refine them?
  • Is their dance clear and fluent?

Athletics

  • Can they run over a long distance?
  • Can they spring over a short distance?
  • Can they throw in different ways?
  • Can they hit a target?
  • Can they jump in different ways?

Outdoor/Adventurous

  • Can they follow a map in a more demanding familiar context?
  • Can they move from one location to another following a map?
  • Can they use clues to follow a route?
  • Can they follow a route accurately, safely and within a time limit?

Gymnastics

  • Can they work in a controlled way?
  • Can they include change of speed?
  • Can they include change of direction?
  • Can they include range of shapes?
  • Can they follow a set of ‘rules’ to produce a sequence?
  • Can they work with a partner to create, repeat and improve a sequence with at least three phases?

Games

  • Can they catch with one hand?
  • Can they throw and catch accurately?
  • Can they hit a ball accurately and with control?
  • Can they keep possession of the ball?
  • Can they move to find a space when they are not in possession during a game?
  • Can they vary tactics and adapt skills according to what is happening?
Computing

KPI

Algorithms and Programs

  • Can they use repeat instructions to draw regular shapes on screen, using commands?
  • Can they experiment with variables to control models?
  • Can they make turns specifying the degrees?
  • Can they give an on-screen robot specific directional instructions that takes them from x to y?
  • Can they make accurate predictions about the outcome of a program they have written?

Data Retrieving and Organising

  • Can they capture images using webcams, screen capture, scanning, visualiser and internet?
  • Can they choose images and download into a file?
  • Can they download images from the camera into files on the computer?
  • Can they copy graphics from a range of sources and paste into a desktop publishing program?
  • Can they use photo editing software to crop photographs and add effects?

Presentation

  • Can they create a lengthy presentation that moves from slide to slide and is aimed at a specific audience?
  • Can they insert sound recordings into a multi media presentation?
  • Do they know how to manipulate text, underline text, centre text, change font and size and save text to a folder?
  • Can they use animation in their presentation?

Databases

  • Can they input data into a prepared database?
  • Can they sort and search a database to answer simple questions?
  • Do they recognise what a spread sheet is?
  • Can they use the terms ‘cells’, ‘rows’ and ‘columns’?
  • Can they enter data, highlight it and make bar charts?
  • Can they copy and paste the graph/bar chart and use it in a WP document?

Using the internet

  • Can they use a search engine to find a specific website?
  • Can they use note-taking skills to decide which text to copy and paste into a document?
  • Can they use tabbed browsing to open two or more web pages at the same time?
  • Can they open a link to a new window? Can they open a document (PDF) and view it?

Communicating

  • Do they appreciate the benefits of ICT to send messages and to communicate?
  • Can they use the automatic spell checker to edit spellings?

E-Safety Skills

  • Do they follow the school’s safer internet rules?
  • Do they recognise the difference between the work of others which has been copied (plagiarism) and restructuring and re-presenting materials in ways which are unique and new?
  • Can they begin to identify when emails should not be opened and when an attachment may not be safe?
  • Can they explain how to use email safely?
  • Can they use different search engines?

E-Safety Knowledge and Understanding

  • Do they follow the school’s safer internet rules?
  • Do they recognise the difference between the work of others which has been copied (plagiarism) and restructuring and re-presenting materials in ways which are unique and new?
  • Can they begin to identify when emails should not be opened and when an attachment may not be safe?
  • Can they explain how to use email safely?
  • Can they use different search engines?

E-Safety Knowledge and Understanding

  • Do they understand the need for rules to keep them safe when exchanging learning and ideas online?
  • Can they recognise that information on the internet may not be accurate or reliable and may be used for bias, manipulation or persuasion?
  • Do they understand that the internet contains fact, fiction and opinion and begin to distinguish between them?
  • Can they use strategies to verify information, e.g. cross checking?
  • Do they understand the need for caution when using an internet search for images and what to do if they find an unsuitable image?
  • Do they understand that copyright exists on most digital images, video and recorded music?
  • Do they understand the need to keep personal information and passwords private?
  • Do they understand that if they make personal information available online it may be seen and used by others?
  • Do they know how to respond if asked for personal information or feel unsafe about content of a message?
  • Can they recognise that cyber bullying is unacceptable and will be sanctioned in line with the school’s policy?
  • Do they know how to report an incident of cyber bullying?
  • Do they know the difference between online communication tools used in school and those used at home?
  • Do they understand the need to develop an alias for some public online use?
  • Do they understand that the outcome of internet searches at home may be different than at school?
Language (Reading)

KPI

  • Applies a growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and etymology) – as listed in English appendix 1 of the national curriculum document – both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that are met.
  • Increases familiarity with a wide range of books including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage and books from other cultures and traditions.
  • Checks that the book makes sense to the reader, discussing the individual’s understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context.
  • Summarises the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas.
  • Retrieves, records and presents information from non-fiction.
  • Participates in discussions about books that are read to the child and those that can be read independently.
  • Provide reasoned justifications for their views about a book
Language (Writing)

KPI

  • Identifies the audience for, and purpose of, the writing.
    Selects the appropriate form and uses other similar writing as models for their own.
  • Proof-reads for spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Ensures the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing.
  • Uses further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader (eg, headings, bullet points, underlining).
    Describes settings, characters and atmosphere.

VPGS

  • Converts nouns or adjectives into verbs using suffixes (eg, -ate; -ise; -ify).
  • Indicates degrees of possibility using adverbs (eg, perhaps, surely) or modal verbs (eg, might, should, will, must).
  • Uses devices to build cohesion within a paragraph (eg, then, after that, this, firstly).
  • Uses commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity.
Languages (French)

KPI

Listening and Responding

  • Do they understand longer passages made up of familiar language in simple sentences?
  • Can they identify the main points and some details?

Speaking

  • Can they hold a simple conversation with at least 3-4 exchanges?
  • Can they use their knowledge of grammar to adapt and substitute single words and phrases?

Reading and Responding

  • Can they understand a short story or factual text and note some of the main points?
  • Can they use context to work out unfamiliar words?

Writing

  • Can they write a paragraph of about 3-4 simple sentences?
  • Can they adapt and substitute individual words and set phrases?
  • Can they use a dictionary or glossary to check words they have learnt?
Mathematics

KPI

  • Divide 1 into 2, 4, 5 and 10 equal parts, and read scales/number lines marked in units of 1 with 2, 4, 5 and 10 equal parts.
  • Convert between units of measure, including using common decimals and fractions.
  • Secure fluency in multiplication table facts, and corresponding division facts, through continued practice.
  • Apply place-value knowledge to known additive and multiplicative number facts (scaling facts by 1 tenth or 1 hundredth).
  • Multiply and divide numbers by 10 and 100; understand this as equivalent to making a number 10 or 100 times the size, or 1 tenth or 1 hundredth times the size.
  • Find factors and multiples of positive whole numbers, including common factors and common multiples, and express a given number as a product of 2 or 3 factors.
  • Multiply any whole number with up to 4 digits by any one-digit number using a formal written method.
  • Divide a number with up to 4 digits by a one-digit number using a formal written method, and interpret remainders appropriately for the context.
  • Find non-unit fractions of quantities.
  • Find equivalent fractions and understand that they have the same value and the same position in the linear number system
  • Recall decimal fraction equivalents for half , quarter , fifth and , tenth and for multiples of these proper fractions.
  • Compare angles, estimate and measure angles in degrees (°) and draw angles of a given size.
  • Compare areas and calculate the area of rectangles (including squares) using standard units.
Science

KPI

Planning

  • Can they plan and carry out a scientific enquiry to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary?
  • Can they make a prediction with reasons?
  • Can they use test results to make predictions to set up comparative and fair tests?
  • Can they present a report of their findings through writing, display and presentation?
  • Can they explore different ways to test an idea, choose the best way and give reasons?
  • Can they vary one factor whilst keeping the others the same in an experiment?
  • Can they use information to help make a prediction?
  • Can they explain, in simple terms, a scientific idea and what evidence supports it?

Obtaining and Presenting Evidence

  • Can they take measurements using a range of scientific equipment with increasing accuracy and precision?
  • Can they take repeat readings when appropriate?
  • Can they record more complex data and results using scientific diagrams, labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs?
  • Can they decide which units of measurement they need to use?
  • Can they explain why a measurement needs to be repeated?

Considering Evidence and Evaluating

  • Can they report and present findings from enquiries through written explanations and conclusions?
  • Can they use a graph to answer scientific questions?
  • Can they find a pattern from their data and explain what it shows?
  • Can they link what they have found out to other science?
  • Can they suggest how to improve their work and say why they think this?

Animals Including Humans

  • Can they describe the changes as humans develop to old age?
  • Can they create a timeline to indicate stages of growth in certain animals, such as frogs and butterflies?
  • Can they describe the changes experienced in puberty?
  • Can they draw a timeline to indicate stages in the growth and development of humans?

Living Things and Their Habitats

  • Can they describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibians, an insects and a bird?
  • Can they describe the life cycles of common plants?
  • Can they explore the work of well know naturalists and animal behaviourists? (David Attenborough and Jane Goodall)
  • Can they observe their local environment and draw conclusions about life-cycles, e.g. plants in the vegetable garden or flower border?
  • Can they compare the life cycles of plants and animals in their local environment with the life cycles of those around the world, e.g. rainforests?

Earth and Space

  • Can they identify and explain the movement of the Earth and other plants relative to the sun in the solar system?
  • Can they explain how seasons and the associated weather is created?
  • Can they describe and explain the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth?
  • Can they describe the sun, earth and moon as approximately spherical bodies?
  • Can they use the idea of the earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky?
  • Can they compare the time of day at different places on the earth?
  • Can they create shadow clocks? Can they begin to understand how older civilizations used the sun to create astronomical clocks, e.g. Stonehenge?
  • Can they explore the work of some scientists? (Ptolemy, Alhazen, Copernicus)

Forces

  • Can they explain that unsupported objects fall towards the earth because of the force of gravity acting between the earth and the falling object?
  • Can they identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction that act between moving surfaces?
  • Can they recognise that some mechanisms, including levers, pulleys and gears, allow a smaller force to have a greater effect?
  • Can they describe and explain how motion is affected by forces? (including gravitational attractions, magnetic attraction and friction)
  • Can they design very effective parachutes? This was edited due to Covid to testing ‘spinners’ in order to reduce required resources
  • Can they work out how water can cause resistance to floating objects?
  • Can they explore how scientists, such as Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton helped to develop the theory of gravitation?

Properties and Changes to Materials

  • Can they compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets?
  • Can they explain how some materials dissolve in liquid to form a solution?
  • Can they describe how to recover a substance from a solution?
  • Can they use their knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving, evaporating?
  • Can they give reasons, based on evidence for comparative and fair tests for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals wood and plastic?
  • Can they describe changes using scientific words? (evaporation, condensation)
  • Can they demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes?
  • Can they explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda?
  • Can they use the terms ‘reversible’ and ‘irreversible’?
  • Can they describe methods for separating mixtures? (filtration, distillation)
  • Can they work out which materials are most effective for keeping us warm or for keeping something cold?
  • Can they use their knowledge of materials to suggest ways to classify? (solids, liquids, gases)
  • Can they explore changes that are difficult to reverse, e.g. burning, rusting and reactions such as vinegar with bicarbonate of soda?
  • Can they explore the work of chemists who created new materials, e.g. Spencer Silver (glue on sticky notes) or Ruth Benerito (wrinkle free cotton)?
Social Studies (History)

The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor

  • Viking raids and invasion
  • resistance by Alfred the Great and Athelstan, first king of England
    further Viking invasions and Danegeld
  • Anglo-Saxon laws and justice
  • Edward the Confessor and his death in 1066

A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

  • the changing power of monarchs (using case studies such as John, Anne and Victoria) and the British Empire
  • democracy in Britain
  • a significant turning point in British history, e.g. the Industrial Revolution ( Darwinism, Irish potato famine, rationing in the war).

Historical enquiry

  • Can they test out a hypothesis in order to answer a question?
  • Do they appreciate how historical artefacts have helped us understand more about British lives in the present and past?
  • Can they research the life of one person who has had an influence on the way Great Britain is divided into four separate countries?

A local history study

a study of an aspect of history or a site dating from a period beyond 1066 that is significant in the locality

Chronological Understanding

  • Can they use dates and historical language in their work?
  • Can they draw a timeline with different time periods outlined which show different information, such as, periods of history, when famous people lived, etc.?
  • Can they use their mathematical skills to work out exact time scales and differences as need be?
  • Can they create timelines which outline the development of specific features, such as medicine; weaponry; transport, etc.

Knowledge and Interpretation

  • Can they describe historical events from the different period/s they are studying/have studied?
  • Can they make comparisons between
    historical periods; explaining things that have changed and things which have stayed the same?
  • Can they explain the role that Britain has had in spreading Christian values across the world?
  • Can they begin to appreciate that how we make decisions has been through a Parliament for some time?
  • Do they appreciate that significant events in history have helped shape the country we have today?
  • Do they have a good understanding as to how crime and punishment has changed over the years?
  • Do they appreciate how major events have created huge differences to the way medicines and health care were developed?
Social Studies (Geography)

Objectives

Geographical Inquiry

  • Can they collect information about a place and use it in a report?
  • Can they map land use?
  • Can they find possible answers to their own geographical questions?
  • Can they make detailed sketches and plans; improving their accuracy later?
  • Can they plan a journey to a place in another part of the world, taking account of distance and time?
  • Can they work out an accurate itinerary detailing a journey to another part of the world?

Physical Geography

  • Can they explain why many cities of the world are situated by rivers?
  • Can they explain how a location fits into its wider geographical location; with reference to physical features?
  • Can they explain how the water cycle works?
  • Can they explain why water is such a valuable commodity?
  • Can they explain what a place (open to environmental and physical change) might be like in the future taking account of physical features?

Human Geography

  • Can they explain why people are attracted to live by rivers?
  • Can they explain how a location fits into its wider geographical location; with reference to human and economical features?
  • Can they explain what a place might be like in the future, taking account of issues impacting on human features?
  • Can they report on ways in which humans have both improved and damaged the environment?

Geographical Knowledge

  • Can they name and locate many of the world’s major rivers on maps?
  • Can they name and locate many of the world’s most famous mountain regions on maps?
  • Can they locate the USA and Canada on a world map and atlas?
  • Can they locate and name the main countries in South America on a world map and atlas?
  • Can they begin to recognise the climate of a given country according to its location on the map?
Arts (Arts)

KPI

Drawing

  • Can they identify and draw simple objects, and use marks and lines to produce texture?
  • Do they successfully use shading to create mood and feeling?
  • Can they organise line, tone, shape and colour to represent figures and forms in movement?
  • Can they show reflections? Can they explain why they have chosen specific materials to draw with?

Painting

  • Can they create a range of moods in their paintings?
  • Can they express their emotions accurately through their painting and sketches?

Printing

  • Can they print using a number of colours?
  • Can they create an accurate print design that meets a given criteria?
  • Can they print onto different materials?

Sketchbooks

  • Do they keep notes in their sketch books as to how they might develop their work further?
  • Do they use their sketch books to compare and discuss ideas with others?

3D/Textiles

Do they experiment with and combine materials and processes to design and make 3D form?

Can they sculpt clay and other moldable materials?

Can they use textile and sewing skills as part of a project, e.g. hanging, textile book, etc.? This could include running stitch, cross stitch, backstitch, appliqué and/or embroidery.

Collage

  • Can they use ceramic mosaic to produce a piece of art?
  • Can they combine visual and tactile qualities to express mood and emotion?

Use of IT

  • Can they create a piece of art work which includes the integration of digital images they have taken?
  • Can they combine graphics and text based on their research?
  • Can they scan images and take digital photos, and use software to alter them, adapt them and create work with meaning?
  • Can they create digital images with animation, video and sound to communicate their ideas?

Knowledge

  • Can they experiment with different styles which artists have used?
  • Do they learn about the work of others by looking at their work in books, the
  • Internet, visits to galleries and other sources of information?
Arts (DT)

KPI

Developing, Planning and Communicating Ideas

  • Can they come up with a range of ideas after they have collected information?
  • Do they take a user’s view into account when designing?
  • Can they produce a detailed step by-step plan?
  • Can they suggest some alternative plans and say what the good points and drawbacks are about each?

Working with tools, equipment, materials and components to make quality products

  • Can they explain why their finished product is going to be of good quality?
  • Can they explain how their product will appeal to the audience?
  • Can they use a range of tools and equipment expertly?
  • Do they persevere through different stages of the making process?

Cooking and Nutrition

  • Can they describe what they do to be both hygienic and safe?
  • How have they presented their product well?

Textiles

  • Do they think what the user would want when choosing textiles?
  • How have they made their product attractive and strong?
  • Can they make up a prototype first?
  • Can they use a range of joining techniques?

Moldable materials

  • Are they motivated enough to refine and further improve their product using moldable materials?

Electrical and mechanical components

  • Can they incorporate a switch into their product?
  • Can they refine their product after testing it?
  • Can they incorporate hydraulics and pneumatics?

Evaluating processes and products

  • Do they keep checking that their design is the best it can be?
  • Do they check whether anything could be improved?
  • Can they evaluate appearance and function against the original criteria?

Stiff and flexible sheet materials

  • Are their measurements accurate enough to ensure that everything is precise?
  • How have they ensured that their product is strong and fit for purpose?
Arts (Music)

KPI

Performing

  • Do they breathe in the correct place when singing? Can they sing and use their understanding of meaning to add expression?
  • Can they maintain their part whilst others are performing their part?
  • Can they perform ‘by ear’ and from simple notations? Can they improvise within a group using melodic and rhythmic phrases?
  • Can they recognise and use basic structural forms e.g. rounds, variations, rondo form?
  • Can they use pitches simultaneously to produce harmony by building up simple chords?
  • Can they devise and play a repeated sequence of pitches on a tuned instrument to accompany a song?

Composing (including notation)

  • Can they change sounds or organise them differently to change the effect?
  • Can they compose music which meets specific criteria?
  • Can they use their notations to record groups of pitches (chords)?
  • Can they use a music diary to record aspects of the composition process?
  • Can they choose the most appropriate tempo for a piece of music?
  • Do they understand the relation between pulse and syncopated patterns?
  • Can they identify (and use) how patterns of repetitions, contrasts and variations can be organised to give structure to a melody, rhythm, dynamic and timbre?

Appraising

  • Can they describe, compare and evaluate music using musical vocabulary?
  • Can they explain why they think their music is successful or unsuccessful?
  • Can they suggest improvements to their own or others’ work?
  • Can they choose the most appropriate tempo for a piece of music?
  • Can they contrast the work of famous composers and show preferences?
  • Can they explain how tempo changes the character of music?
  • Can they identify where a gradual change in dynamics has helped to shape a phrase of music?
PSHE (PE)

KPI

Acquiring and Developing Skills

  • Can they link skills, techniques and ideas and apply them accurately and appropriately?
  • Do they show good control in their movements?

Evaluating and Improving

  • Can they compare and comment on skills, techniques and ideas that they and others have used?
  • Can they use their observations to improve their work?

Health and fitness

  • Can they explain some important safety principles when preparing for exercise?
  • Can they explain what effect exercise has on their body?
  • Can they explain why exercise is important?

Dance

  • Can they compose their own dances in a creative and imaginative way?
  • Can they perform to an accompaniment, expressively and sensitively?
  • Are their movements controlled?
  • Does their dance show clarity, fluency, accuracy and consistency?

Athletics

  • Are they controlled when taking off and landing in a jump?
  • Can they throw with accuracy?
  • Can they combine running and jumping?
  • Can they follow specific rules?

Outdoor/Adventurous

  • Can they follow a map in an unknown location?
  • Can they use clues and compass directions to navigate a route?
  • Can they change their route if there is a problem?
  • Can they change their plan if they get new information?

Games

  • Can they gain possession by working as a team? Can they pass in different ways?
  • Can they use forehand and backhand with a racquet?
  • Can they field?
  • Can they choose the best tactics for attacking and defending?
  • Can they use a number of techniques to pass, dribble and shoot?

Gymnastics

  • Can they make complex or extended sequences?
  • Can they combine action, balance and shape?
  • Can they perform consistently to different audiences?
Computing

KPI

Algorithms and Programs

  • Can they combine sequences of instructions and procedures to turn devices on or off?
  • Do they understand input and output? Can they use an ICT program to control an external device that is electrical and/or mechanical?
  • Can they use ICT to measure sound or light or temperate using sensors?
  • Can they explore ‘What is’ questions by playing adventure or quest games?
  • Can they write programs that have sequences and repetitions?

Data Retrieving and Organising

  • Can they listen to streaming audio such as online radio?
  • Can they download and listen to podcasts?
  • Can they produce and upload a podcast?
  • Can they manipulate sounds using Audacity?
  • Can they select music from open sources and incorporate it into multimedia presentations?
  • Can they work on simple film editing?

Presentation

  • Can they use a range of presentation applications?
  • Do they consider audience when editing a simple film?
  • Do they know how to prepare and then present a simple film?
  • Can they use ICT to record sounds and capture both still and video images?
  • Can they make a homepage for a website that contains links to other pages?
  • Can they capture sounds, images and video?
  • Can they use the word count tool to check the length of a document?
  • Can they use bullets and numbering tools?
  • Can they make a multimedia presentation that contains: sound; animation; video and buttons to navigate?
  • Can they save an image document as a gif or i peg. file format using the ‘save as’ command?
  • Can they make an information poster using graphics skills to good effect?

Databases

  • Can they create a formula in a spreadsheet and then check for accuracy and plausibility?
  • Can they search databases for information using symbols such as = > or <?
  • Can they create databases planning the fields, rows and columns?
  • Can they create graphs and tables to be copied and pasted into other documents?

Using the internet

  • Can they use a search engine using keyword searches?
  • Can they compare the results of different searches?
  • Can they decide which sections are appropriate to copy and paste from at least two web pages?
  • Can they save stored information following simple lines of enquiry?
  • Can they download a document and save it to the computer?

Communicating

  • Can they use instant messaging to communicate with class members?
  • Can they conduct a video chat with someone elsewhere in the school or in another school?

E-Safety Skills

  • Do they follow the school’s safer internet rules?
  • Can they make safe choices about use of technology?
  • Do they use technology in ways which minimises risk, e.g. responsible use of online discussions, etc?
  • Can they create strong passwords and manage them so that they remain strong?
  • Can they independently, and with regard for e-safety, select and use appropriate communication tools to solve problems by collaborating and communicating with others within and beyond school?
  • Can they competently use the internet as a search tool?
  • Can they reference information sources?
  • Can they use appropriate strategies for finding, critically evaluating, validating and verifying information, e.g. using different keywords, skim reading to check relevance of information, cross checking with different websites or other non ICT resources?
  • Can they use knowledge of the meaning of different domain names and common website extensions (e.g. .co.uk; .com; .ac; .sch; .org; .gov; .net) to support validation of information?

E-Safety Knowledge and Understanding

  • Can they discuss the positive and negative impact of the use of ICT in their own lives and those of their peers and family?
  • Do they understand the potential risk of providing personal information online?
  • Do they recognise why people may publish content that is not accurate and understand the need to be critical evaluators of content?
  • Do they understand that some websites and/or pop-ups have commercial interests that may affect the way the information is presented?
  • Do they recognise the potential risks of using internet communication tools and understand how to minimise those risks (including scams and phishing)?
  • Do they understand that some material on the internet is copyrighted and may not be copied or downloaded?
  • Do they understand that some messages may be malicious and know how to deal with this?
  • Do they understand that online environments have security settings, which can be altered, to protect the user?
  • Do they understand the benefits of developing a ‘nickname’ for online use?
  • Do they understand that some malicious adults may use various techniques to make contact and elicit personal information?
  • Do they know that it is unsafe to arrange to meet unknown people online?
  • Do they know how to report any suspicions?
  • Do they understand they should not publish other people’s pictures or tag them on the internet without permission?
  • Do they know that content put online is extremely difficult to remove?
  • Do they know what to do if they discover something malicious or inappropriate?
Language (Reading)

KPI

  • Applies a growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and etymology) – as listed in English appendix 1 of the national curriculum document – both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that are met.
  • Increases familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage and books from other cultures and traditions.
  • Checks that the book makes sense to the reader, discussing the individual’s understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context.
  • Summarises the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas.
  • Retrieves, records and presents information from non-fiction.
  • Participates in discussions about books that area read to the individual and those that can be read independently.
  • Promotes reasoned justifications for their views about a book.
Language (Writing)

KPI

Composition

  • Identifies the audience for, and purpose of, the writing.
  • Selects the appropriate form and uses other similar writing as models for their own.
  • Proof-reads for spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Ensures the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing.
  • Uses further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader (eg, headings, bullet points, underlining).
  • Can describe settings, characters and atmosphere.

SPaG

  • Uses dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words.
  • Can understand and apply the difference between vocabulary typical of informal speech and vocabulary appropriate for formal speech and writing (eg, find out – discover; ask for – request; go in – enter)
  • Uses the passive voice to affect the presentation of information in a sentence (eg, ‘I broke the window in the greenhouse’ versus ‘The window in the greenhouse was broken (by me).’
  • Can use layout devices, such as headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text.
  • Uses the colon to introduce a list.
  • Punctuates bullet points to list information.
Languages (French)

KPI

Listening and Responding

  • Do they understand longer passages made up of familiar language in simple sentences?
  • Can they identify the main points and some details?

Speaking

  • Can they hold a simple conversation with at least 3-4 exchanges?
  • Can they use their knowledge of grammar to adapt and substitute single words and phrases?

Reading and Responding

  • Can they understand a short story or factual text and note some of the main points?
  • Can they use context to work out unfamiliar words?

Writing

  • Can they write a paragraph of about 3-4 simple sentences?
  • Can they adapt and substitute individual words and set phrases?
  • Can they use a dictionary or glossary to check words they have learnt?
Mathematics

KPI

  • Understand the relationship between powers of 10 from 1 hundredth to 10 million, and use this to make a given number 10, 100, 1,000, 1 tenth, 1 hundredth or 1 thousandth times the size (multiply and divide by 10, 100 and 1,000).
  • Recognise the place value of each digit in numbers up to 10 million, including decimal fractions, and compose and decompose numbers up to 10 million using standard and nonstandard partitioning.
  • Reason about the location of any number up to 10 million, including decimal fractions, in the linear number system, and round numbers, as appropriate, including in contexts.
  • Divide powers of 10, from 1 hundredth to 10 million, into 2, 4, 5 and 10 equal parts, and read scales/number lines with labelled intervals divided into 2, 4, 5 and 10 equal parts.
  • Understand that 2 numbers can be related additively or multiplicatively, and quantify additive and multiplicative relationships (multiplicative relationships restricted to multiplication by a whole number).
  • Use a given additive or multiplicative calculation to derive or complete a related calculation, using arithmetic properties, inverse relationships, and place-value understanding.
  • Solve problems involving ratio relationships.
  • Solve problems with 2 unknowns.
  • Recognise when fractions can be simplified, and use common factors to simplify fractions.
  • Express fractions in a common denomination and use this to compare fractions that are similar in value.
  • Compare fractions with different denominators, including fractions greater than 1, using reasoning, and choose between reasoning and common denomination as a comparison strategy
  • Draw, compose, and decompose shapes according to given properties, including dimensions, angles and area, and solve related problems.
Science

KPI

Planning

  • Can they explore different ways to test an idea, choose the best way, and give reasons?
  • Can they vary one factor whilst keeping the others the same in an experiment? Can they explain why they do this?
  • Can they plan and carry out an investigation by controlling variables fairly and accurately?
  • Can they make a prediction with reasons?
  • Can they use information to help make a prediction?
  • Can they use test results to make further predictions and set up further comparative tests?
  • Can they explain, in simple terms, a scientific idea and what evidence supports it?
  • Can they present a report of their findings through writing, display and presentation?
  • Can they choose the best way to answer a question?
  • Can they use information from different sources to answer a question and plan an investigation?
  • Can they make a prediction which links with other scientific knowledge?
  • Can they identify the key factors when planning a fair test?
  • Can they explain how a scientist has used their scientific understanding plus good ideas to have a breakthrough?

Obtaining and Presenting Evidence

  • Can they explain why they have chosen specific equipment? (incl ICT based equipment)
  • Can they decide which units of measurement they need to use?
  • Can they explain why a measurement needs to be repeated?
  • Can they record their measurements in different ways? (incl bar charts, tables and line graphs)
  • Can they take measurements using a range of scientific equipment with increasing accuracy and precision?
  • Can they plan in advance which equipment they will need and use it well?
  • Can they make precise measurements?
  • Can they collect information in different ways?
  • Can they record their measurements and observations systematically?
  • Can they explain qualitative and quantitative data?

Considering Evidence and Evaluating

  • Can they find a pattern from their data and explain what it shows?
  • Can they use a graph to answer scientific questions?
  • Can they link what they have found out to other science?
  • Can they suggest how to improve their work and say why they think this?
  • Can they record more complex data and results using scientific diagrams, classification keys, tables, bar charts, line graphs and models?
  • Can they report findings from investigations through written explanations and conclusions?
  • Can they identify scientific evidence that has been used to support to refute ideas or arguments?
  • Can they report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations?
  • Can they draw conclusions from their work?
  • Can they link their conclusions to other scientific knowledge?
  • Can they explain how they could improve their way of working?

Evolution and Inheritance

  • Can they recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the earth millions of years ago?
  • Can they recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents?
  • Can they give reasons why offspring are not identical to each other or to their parents?
  • Can they explain the process of evolution and describe the evidence for this?
  • Can they identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution?
  • Can they talk about the work of Charles Darwin, Mary Anning and Alfred Wallace?
  • Can they explain how some living things adapt to survive in extreme conditions?
  • Can they analyse the advantages and disadvantages of specific adaptations, such as being on two rather than four feet?
  • Can they begin to understand what is meant by DNA?

Living Things and Their Habitats

  • Can they describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences including microorganisms, plants and animals?
  • Can they give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics?
  • Can they explain why classification is important?
  • Can they readily group animals into reptiles, fish, amphibians, birds and mammals?
  • Can they sub divide their original groupings and explain their divisions?
  • Can they group animals into vertebrates and invertebrates?
  • Can they find out about the significance of the work of scientists such as
  • Carl Linnaeus, a pioneer of classification?

Animals Including Humans

  • Can they identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood?
  • Can they recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function?
  • Can they describe the ways in which nutrients and water and transported within animals, including humans?
  • Can they explore the work of medical pioneers, for example, William Harvey and Galen and recognise how much we have learnt about our bodies?
  • Can they compare the organ systems of humans to other animals?
  • Can they make a diagram of the human body and explain how different parts work and depend on one another?
  • Can they name the major organs in the human body?
  • Can they locate the major human organs?
  • Can they make a diagram that outlines the main parts of a body?

Electricity

  • Can they identify and name the basic parts of a simple electric series circuit? (cells, wires, bulbs, switches, buzzers)
  • Can they compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers, the on/off position of switches?
  • Can they use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram?
  • Can they make their own traffic light system or something similar?
  • Can they explain the danger of short circuits?
  • Can they explain what a fuse is?
  • Can they explain how to make changes in a circuit?
  • Can they explain the impact of changes in a circuit? Can they explain the effect of changing the voltage of a battery?

Light

  • Can they recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines?
  • Can they use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye?
  • Can they explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to object s and then to our eyes?
  • Can they use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them?
  • Can they explain how different colours of light can be created?
  • Can they use and explain how simple optical instruments work? (periscope, telescope, binoculars, mirror, magnifying glass, Newton’s first reflecting telescope)
  • Can they explore a range of phenomena, including rainbows, colours on soap bubbles, objects looking bent in water and coloured filters.
Social Studies (History)

A local history study

  • a depth study linked to one of the British areas of study listed in the National Curriculum
  • a study over time tracing how several aspects of national history are reflected in the locality (this can go beyond 1066)

A non-European society that provides contrast with British history

one in-depth study chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin civilisation (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300.

A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

  • changes in an aspect of social history, such as crime and punishment from the Anglo-Saxons to the present, leisure and entertainment in the 20th Century, immigration and changing demographics in Britain (e.g. the Windrush generation)
  • the legacy of Greek or Roman culture (art, architecture or literature) on later periods in British history, including the present day
  • a significant turning point in British history, e.g. WWI or the Battle of Britain

Chronological Understanding

  • Can they say where a period of history fits on a timeline?
  • Can they place a specific event on a timeline by decade?
  • Can they place features of historical events and people from past societies and periods in a chronological framework?
  • Do they appreciate that some ancient civilizations showed greater advancements than people who lived centuries after them?

Knowledge and Interpretation

  • Can they summarise the main events from a specific period in history, explaining the order in which key events happened?
  • Can they summarise how Britain has had a major influence on world history?
  • Can they summarise what Britain may have learnt from other countries and civilizations through time gone by and more recently?
  • Can they describe features of historical events and people from past societies and periods they have studied?
  • Can they recognise and describe differences and similarities/ changes and continuity between different periods of history?
  • Can they suggest relationships between causes in history?
  • Can they appreciate how Britain once had an Empire and how that has helped or hindered our relationship with a number of countries today?
  • Can they trace the main events that define Britain’s journey from a mono to a multi-cultural society?

Historical Enquiry

  • Can they look at two different versions and say how the author may be attempting to persuade or give a specific viewpoint?
  • Can they identify and explain their understanding of propaganda?
  • Can they describe a key event from Britain’s past using a range of evidence from different sources?
  • Can they suggest why there may be different interpretations of events?
  • Can they suggest why certain events, people and changes might be seen as more significant than others?
  • Can they pose and answer their own historical questions?
Social Studies (Geography)

Objectives

Geographical Inquiry

  • Can they confidently explain scale and use maps with a range of scales?
  • Can they choose the best way to collect information needed and decide the most appropriate units of measure?
  • Can they make careful measurements and use the data?
  • Can they use OS maps to answer questions?
  • Can they use maps, aerial photos, plans and web resources to describe what a locality might be like?
  • Can they define geographical questions to guide their research?
  • Can they use a range of self selected resources to answer questions?

Physical Geography

  • Can they give extended descriptions of the physical features of different places around the world?
  • Can they describe how some places are similar and others are different in relation to their human features?
  • Can they accurately use a 4 figure grid reference?
  • Can they create sketch maps when carrying out a field study?
  • Can they plan a journey to another part of the world which takes account of time zones?
  • Do they understand the term sustainable development? Can they use it in different contexts?

Human Geography

  • Can they give an extended description of the human features of different places around the world?
  • Can they map land use with their own criteria?
  • Can they describe how some places are similar and others are different in relation to their physical features?
  • Can they explain how human activity has caused an environment to change?
  • Can they analyse population data on two settlements and report on findings and questions raised?

Geographical Knowledge

  • Can they recognise key symbols used on ordnance survey maps?
  • Can they name the largest desert in the world?
  • Can they identify and name the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn as well as the Arctic and Antarctic circles?
  • Can they explain how the time zones work?
  • Can they name and locate the main canals that link different continents?
  • Can they name the main lines of latitude and meridian of longitude?
Arts (Arts)

KPI

Drawing

  • Do their sketches communicate emotions and a sense of self with accuracy and imagination?
  • Can they explain why they have combined different tools to create their drawings?
  • Can they explain why they have chosen specific drawing techniques?

Painting

  • Can they explain what their own style is?
  • Can they use a wide range of techniques in their work?
  • Can they explain why they have chosen specific painting techniques?

Printing

  • Can they overprint using different colours?
  • Do they look very carefully at the methods they use and make decisions about the effectiveness of their printing methods?

Sketchbooks

  • Do their sketch books contain detailed notes, and quotes explaining about items?
  • Do they compare their methods to those of others and keep notes in their sketchbooks?
  • Do they combine graphics and text based research of commercial design, for example magazines etc., to influence the layout of their sketch books.
  • Do they adapt and refine their work to reflect its
    meaning and purpose, keeping notes and annotations in their sketch books?

3D/Textiles

  • Can they create models on a range of scales?
  • Can they create work which is open to interpretation by the audience?
  • Can they include both visual and tactile elements in their work?

Collage

  • Can they justify the materials they have chosen?
  • Can they combine pattern, tone and shape?

Use of IT

  • Do they use software packages to create pieces of digital art to design.
  • Can they create a piece of art which can be used as part of a wider presentation?

Knowledge

  • Can they make a record about the styles and qualities in their work?
  • Can they say what their work is influenced by?
  • Can they include technical aspects in their work, e.g. architectural design?
Arts (DT)

KPI

Developing, Planning and Communicating Ideas

  • Can they use a range of information to inform their design?
  • Can they use market research to inform plans?
  • Can they work within constraints?
  • Can they follow and refine their plan if necessary?
  • Can they justify their plan to someone else?
  • Do they consider culture and society in their designs?

Working with tools, equipment, materials and components to make quality products

  • Can they use tools and materials precisely?
  • Do they change the way they are working if needed?

Cooking and Nutrition

  • Can they explain how their product should be stored with reasons?
  • Can they set out to grow their own products with a view to making a salad, taking account of time required to grow different foods?

Evaluating processes and products

  • How well do they test and evaluate their final product?
  • Is it fit for purpose?
  • What would improve it?
  • Would different resources have improved their product?
  • Would they need more or different information to make it even better?
  • Does their product meet all design criteria?
  • Did they consider the use of the product when selecting materials?

Textiles

  • Have they thought about how their product could be sold?
  • Have they given considered thought about what would improve their product even more?

Moldable materials

  • Can they justify why the chosen material was the best for the task?
  • Can they justify design in relation to the audience?

Electrical and mechanical components

  • Can they use different kinds of circuit in their product?
  • Can they think of ways in which adding a circuit would improve their product?

Stiff and flexible sheet materials

  • Can they justify why they selected specific materials?
  • How have they ensured that their work is precise and accurate?
  • Can they hide joints so as to improve the look of their product?
Arts (Music)

KPI

Performing

  • Can they sing a harmony part confidently and accurately? Can they perform parts from memory?
  • Can they perform using notations?
  • Can they take the lead in a performance?
  • Can they take on a solo part? Can they provide rhythmic support?
  • Can they perform a piece of music which contains two (or more) distinct melodic or rhythmic parts, knowing how the parts will fit together?

Composing (including notation)

  • Can they use a variety of different musical devices in their composition? (incl melody, rhythms and chords)
  • Do they recognise that different forms of notation serve different purposes?
  • Can they use different forms of notation?
  • Can they combine groups of beats?
  • Can they show how a small change of tempo can make a piece of music more effective?
  • Do they use the full range of chromatic pitches to build up chords, melodic lines and bass lines?

Appraising

  • Can they refine and improve their work?
  • Can they evaluate how the venue, occasion and purpose affects the way a piece of music is created?
  • Can they analyse features within different pieces of music?
  • Can they compare and contrast the impact that different composers from different times will have had on the people of the time?
  • Can they appraise the introductions, interludes and endings for songs and compositions they have created?
PSHE (PE)

KPI

Acquiring and Developing Skills

  • Do they apply their skills, techniques and ideas consistently?
  • Do they show precision, control and fluency?

Evaluating and Improving

  • Can they analyse and explain why they have used specific skills or techniques?
  • Can they modify use of skills or techniques to improve their work?
  • Can they create their own success criteria for evaluating?

Health and fitness

  • Can they explain how the body reacts to different kinds of exercise?
  • Can they choose appropriate warm ups and cool downs?
  • Can they explain why we need regular and safe exercise?

Dance

  • Can they develop imaginative dances in a specific style?
  • Can they choose their own music, style and dance?

Athletics

  • Can they demonstrate stamina?
  • Can they use their skills in different situations?

Outdoor/Adventurous

  • Can they plan a route and series of clues for someone else?
  • Can they plan with others taking account of safety and danger?

Games

  • Can they explain complicated rules?
  • Can they make a team plan and communicate it to others?
  • Can they lead others in a game situation?

Gymnastics

  • Do they combine their own work with that of others?
  • Can they link their sequences to specific timings?
Computing

KPI

Algorithms and Programs

  • Can they explain how an algorithm works?
  • Can they detect errors in a program and correct them?
  • Can they use an ICT program to control a number of events for an external device?
  • Can they use ICT to measure sound, light or temperature using sensors and interpret the data?
  • Can they explore ‘what if’ questions by planning different scenarios for controlled devices?
  • Can they use input from sensors to trigger events?
  • Can they check and refine a series of instructions?

Data Retrieving and Organising

  • Can they explore the menu options and experiment with images (colour effects, options, snap to grid, grid settings etc.)?
  • Can they add special effects to alter the appearance of a graphic?
  • Can they ‘save as’ gif or i peg. wherever possible to make the file size smaller (for emailing or downloading)?
  • Can they make an information poster using their graphics skills to good effect?

Presentation

  • Can they present a film for a specific audience and then adapt same film for a different audience?
  • Can they create a sophisticated multimedia presentation?
  • Can they confidently choose the correct page set up option when creating a document?
  • Can they confidently use text formatting tools, including heading and body text?
  • Can they use the ‘hanging indent’ tool to help format work where appropriate (e.g. a play script)?
  • Can they incorporate graphics where appropriate, using the most effective text wrapping formats?

Databases

  • Can they collect live data using data logging equipment?
  • Can they identify data error, patterns and sequences?
  • Can they use the formulae bar to explore mathematical scenarios?
  • Can they create their own database and present information from it?

Using the internet

  • Can they contribute to discussions online? Can they use a search engine using keyword searches?
  • Can they use complex searches using such as ‘+’ ‘OR’ ”Find the phrase in inverted commas”?
  • Can they compare the information provided on two tabbed websites looking for bias and perspective?

Communicating

  • Can they conduct a video chat with people in another country or organisation?
  • Can they conduct a video chat with more than one person at a time?

E-Safety Skills

  • Do they follow the school’s safer internet rules?
  • Can they make safe choices about use of technology?
  • Do they use technology in ways which minimises risk, e.g. responsible use of online discussions, etc?
  • Can they create strong passwords and manage them so that they remain strong?
  • Can they independently, and with regard for e-safety, select and use appropriate communication tools to solve problems by collaborating and communicating with others within and beyond school?
  • Can they competently use the internet as a search tool?
  • Can they reference information sources?
  • Can they use appropriate strategies for finding, critically evaluating, validating and verifying information, e.g. using different keywords, skim reading to check relevance of information, cross checking with different websites or other non ICT resources?
  • Can they use knowledge of the meaning of different domain names and common website extensions (e.g. .co.uk; .com; .ac; .sch; .org; .gov; .net) to support validation of information?

E-Safety Knowledge and Understanding

  • Can they discuss the positive and negative impact of the use of ICT in their own lives and those of their peers and family?
  • Do they understand the potential risk of providing personal information online?
  • Do they recognise why people may publish content that is not accurate and understand the need to be critical evaluators of content?
  • Do they understand that some websites and/or pop-ups have commercial interests that may affect the way the information is presented?
  • Do they recognise the potential risks of using internet communication tools and understand how to minimise those risks (including scams and phishing)?
  • Do they understand that some material on the internet is copyrighted and may not be copied or downloaded? Do they understand that some messages may be malicious and know how to deal with this?
  • Do they understand that online environments have security settings, which can be altered, to protect the user? Do they understand the benefits of developing a ‘nickname’ for online use?
  • Do they understand that some malicious adults may use various techniques to make contact and elicit personal information?
  • Do they know that it is unsafe to arrange to meet unknown people online?
  • Do they know how to report any suspicions?
  • Do they understand they should not publish other people’s pictures or tag them on the internet without permission? Do they know that content put online is extremely difficult to remove?
  • Do they know what to do if they discover something malicious or inappropriate?